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categories: Memoir & Biography, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:A Memoir of the South Carolina Coast
custom_byline1: Genevieve C. Peterkin
custom_byline2: foreword by Lee G. Brockington
afterword by William P. Baldwin
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custom_author_blurb:Local historian and environmentalist Genevieve C. Peterkin (1928–2011) lived in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, for most of her life.

William P. Baldwin, a lifelong resident of the South Carolina lowcountry, is the author of several works of fiction and nonfiction, including the novels The Hard to Catch Mercy and Charles Town.

Lee G. Brockington is a senior interpreter for the Belle W. Baruch Foundation at Hobcaw Barony in Georgetown County and the author of Plantation between the Waters: A Brief History of Hobcaw Barony.
custom_reviews:"Titled after the popular spiritual, this book candidly depicts the life and times of many residents of the lowcountry through stories that sing of the joys and sorrows of everyday life."—Library Journal

"Peterkin's book is a treasure. Not quite an autobiography, not exactly a history, it is a very personal account of a special time and place and the people who made it so."—State (Columbia, S.C.)

"Heaven Is a Beautiful Place is simultaneously local and universal, intimate and expansive, funny and sad. . . . The hopeful quality of Heaven comes through distinctly, especially in Peterkin's wisdom about embracing the moment."—Charleston (S.C.) Post & Courier

"Peterkin's voice and Baldwin's editing . . . give glimpses and insights into an evolving seacoast community."—Coastal Observer

"If you read one book about South Carolina this year, make it Heaven Is a Beautiful Place."—Lexington County Chronicle
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content: Born in 1928 in the small coastal town of Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, Genevieve "Sister" Peterkin grew up with World War II bombing practice in her front yard, deep-sea fishing expeditions, and youthful rambles through the lowcountry. She shared her bedroom with a famous ghost and an impatient older sister. But most of all she listened. She absorbed the tales of her talented mother and her beloved friend, listened to the stories of the region's older residents, some of them former slaves, who were her friends, neighbors, and teachers.

In this new edition she once again shares with readers her insider's knowledge of the lowcountry plantations, gardens, and beaches that today draw so many visitors. Beneath the humor, hauntings, and treasures of local history, she tells another, deeper story—one that deals with the struggle for racial equality in the South, with the sometimes painful adventures of marriage and parenthood, and with inner struggles for faith and acceptance. This edition includes a new foreword by coastal writer and researcher Lee G. Brockington and a new afterword by coauthor and lowcountry novelist William P. Baldwin.
categories: Political Science, paperback, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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Pages: 432
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custom_subtitle:Readings on the First Ladies
custom_byline1: edited by Robert P. Watson and Anthony J. Eksterowicz
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custom_author_blurb:Robert P. Watson has written or edited seven previous books, including The Presidents' Wives: Reassessing the Office of First Lady and the encyclopedia American First Ladies. He is an associate professor of political science at Florida Atlantic University and a former editor of the journal White House Studies.

Anthony J. Eksterowicz is a professor of political science at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, and an editor of White House Studies. He is the coauthor of American Democracy: Representation, Participation, and the Future of the Republic and coeditor of The Post–Cold War Presidency and The President and Foreign Policy: Chief Architect or General Contractor.
custom_reviews:"The Presidential Companion . . . centers on the expansion of traditional duties and expectations over the course of the past two centuries. Much significance is also attached to the level of personal and political intimacy shared between both effective and controversial first ladies and their husbands."—

"The chapters in The Presidential Companion cover either singly or as a group the development of the position [of First Lady], its social influence, its political and policy influence, and the modern first ladies of the past two decades."—

"The Presidential Companion is a scholarly and very highly recommended contribution to American political science and women's studies reading lists."—
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content: Bringing together the work of notable historians, political scientists, and sociologists, The Presidential Companion: Readings on the First Ladies offers a collection of essays that demonstrate the political relevance of first ladies throughout U.S. history and the dramatic expansion of their power during the twentieth century. With a foreword by Hillary Clinton's former chief of staff, Melanne Verveer, this anthology fills a gap in scholarship about the position of first lady and reveals the political acumen and activism of a number of the holders of this unofficial executive office.

The contributors reveal how the office has grown in political influence, from Martha Washington's selection of furnishings for the presidential mansion to Hillary Rodham Clinton's leadership of the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform. They underscore the notion that an understanding of presidential spouses is central to the study of the American presidency. At the same time the volume dispels the myth that Eleanor Roosevelt and her successors have been the only presidential spouses to make significant public and political contributions to the nation.

Bringing this second edition up to date are two new chapters on the first ladyship of Laura Bush and on analyzing public perceptions of Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush.
categories: Southern History, Business & Economics, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 216
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custom_subtitle:How Electric Cooperatives Transformed Rural South Carolina
custom_byline1: Lacy K. Ford and Jared Bailey
custom_byline2: foreword by James E. Clyburn
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custom_author_blurb:Lacy K. Ford, professor of history at the University of South Carolina, is the author of several books, including Deliver Us from Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South.
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content: Early in the twentieth century, for-profit companies such as Duke Power and South Carolina Electric and Gas brought electricity to populous cities and towns across South Carolina, while rural areas remained in the dark. It was not until the advent of publicly owned electric cooperatives in the 1930s that the South Carolina countryside was gradually introduced to the conveniences of life with electricity. Today, electric cooperatives serve more than a quarter of South Carolina's citizens and more than seventy percent of the state's land area, bringing not only power but also high-speed broadband to rural communities.

The rise of "public" power—electricity serviced by member-owned cooperatives and sanctioned by federal and state legislation—is a complicated saga encompassing politics, law, finance, and rural economic development. Empowering Communities examines how the cooperatives helped bring fundamental and transformational change to the lives of rural people in South Carolina, from light to broadband.

James E. Clyburn, the majority whip of the U.S. House of Representatives from South Carolina, provides a foreword.
categories: Southern History, paperback, Books,
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custom_subtitle:The WPA Guide to Its Towns and Countryside
custom_byline1: introduction by Phinizy Spalding
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custom_author_blurb:Phinizy Spalding, a native Georgian, is a trained American Colonial Historian whose scholarly work on James Oglethorpe has attracted widespread attention in the field. Spalding has taught history at the University of Georgia since 1966 and has published widely in the general field of Georgia history. He edited the state's historical journal, the Georgia Historical Quarterly, from 1973–80 as the successor of E. Merton Coulter, and has held important positions in the state's premiere historic preservation organization as well. In the final analysis, Spalding is probably as well qualified as any, bearing in mind his long experience and demonstrated affection for the state, to introduce this American Guide Series volume reprint.
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content: Originally published almost fifty years ago as part of the Federal Writers' Program, a division of the Works Progress Administration, this book is a reprint of the original WPA guide for Georgia. Divided into four sections, the general background, cities, tours, and appendices, the book features 17 essays on a variety of topics from Georgia's natural setting and resources to its architecture and sporta and recreation. Detailed descriptions of the state's six major cities—Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus, Macon and Savannah—are also included, and there are 17 remarkably detailed guided tours to all sections of the state as well. In addition to the original chapters, Phinizy Spalding has written a new introduction and a new appendix.
categories: Southern History, U.S. History, American Revolution, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 172
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custom_byline1: edited by Walter Edgar
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custom_author_blurb:Walter Edgar is the Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina.
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content: Paul Revere's midnight ride; the Battles at Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill; and the people and places associated with the early days of the American Revolution hold a special place in America's collective memory. Often lost in this narrative is the pivotal role that South Carolina played in the Revolutionary conflict, especially when the war moved south after 1780. Drawing upon the entries in the award-winning South Carolina Encyclopedia, this volume shines a light on the central role South Carolina played in the story of American independence.

During the war, more than 200 battles and skirmishes were fought in South Carolina, more than any other state. The battles of Ninety Six, Cowpens, Charleston Harbor, among others, helped to shape the course of the war and are detailed here. It also includes well-known leaders and lesser-known figures who contributed to the course of American history. As the United States approaches the 250th anniversary of its independence, this volume serves as a reminder of the trials and sacrifice that were required to make a new nation.
categories: Southern History, Cultural Studies & Sociology, paperback, ebook, Books,
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Pages: 140
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custom_subtitle:Freedom and Progress in Southern Conservative Thought, 1820-1860
custom_byline1: Eugene D. Genovese
custom_byline2: foreword by Douglas Ambrose
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custom_author_blurb:Eugene D. Genovese (1930–2012) was Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the University Center in Atlanta, Georgia. He was awarded the Bancroft Prize in 1975 for Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made.
custom_reviews:"Genovese subjects the contradictions of conservative proslavery thought to a respectful if withering critique."—American Historical Review

"This study, based on unparalleled familiarity with the writings of antebellum southern thinkers, has much to tell us about topics that have long interested historians: the slaveholders' world view, its relationship to that of Americans (and Westerners) in general, and the persistent question of southern distinctiveness."—The Journal of American History

"Genovese lays bare the contradictions of the proslavery argument. Contrary to southern claims, free labor produced greater material progress. Slaveholders inconsistently pictured the North as powerful and aggressive, and in the next breath, maintained that the social system of the North was collapsing. By taking seriously the work of southern political theorists, economists, and theologians, Genovese offers penetrating insights into the world view of slaveholders. His study deserves a wide audience."—The Journal of the Early Republic

"With The Slaveholders' Dilemma, Eugene Genovese reminds us once again why he is both the most influential and the most controversial southern historian of his generation. No modern scholar has succeeded in writing with empathy about both slaves and slaveholders as well as Genovese, and this slender volume offers a cogent and forceful statement of Genovese's most recent thinking on what he considers the distinctive conservatism of the Old South."—Reviews in American History
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content: In The Slaveholders' Dilemma, Eugene D. Genovese explores the efforts of American slaveholders to reconcile the intellectual dilemma in which they found themselves as supporters of freedom but defenders of slavery. In the American South slaveholders perceived themselves as thoroughly modern, moral men who protected human progress against the perversions of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Surprisingly, they also accepted the widespread idea that freedom generated the economic, social, and moral progress they embraced as their own cause. Nonetheless, they continued to defend slavery. In this compact but densely argued volume, Genovese rehearses the central arguments that would define the latter portion of his career, thus offering a window not only into the mind of the master class but also the mind of one of the most important scholars of the American South.

A new foreword is provided by Douglas Ambrose, professor of history at Hamilton College and author of Henry Hughes and Proslavery Thought in the Old South.
categories: Civil War, paperback, ebook, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 200
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custom_byline1: Marion B. Lucas
custom_byline2: foreword by Anne Sarah Rubin
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custom_author_blurb:Marion B. Lucas is University Distinguished Professor of history at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green.
custom_reviews:"This splendid little volume should put to rest forever the question of who burned the capital city of South Carolina."—Civil War History

"Well worthy of examination by all interested in the nature of war and the social, political, and economic ramifications of total warfare. Professor Lucas is to be commended for a very worthy research achievement."—Journal of Southern History

"For a few South Carolinians, this little book will generate more heat than anything Mother Nature can do this summer. . . It is doubtful Lucas' book will ever shut down the debate over the burning of Columbia. History spawns passionate debate around here, as we've heard all year. But at least those who read it carefully should benefit from a little more balanced historical background."—The State

"deals with one of the most difficult, most delicate issues of the Civil War and deals with it in an honest, unbiased manner."—Midlands Weekend

"The results of his efforts are eminently satisfying. He brings order out of contradiction and confusion by carefully weighing the evidence and presenting the results of his study in a simple, straightforward, and interesting manner."—McCormick Messenger
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content: Who burned South Carolina's capital city on February 17, 1865? Even before the embers had finished smoldering, Confederates and Federals accused each other of starting the blaze, igniting a controversy that has raged for more than a century. Marion B. Lucas sifts through official reports, newspapers, and eyewitness accounts, and the evidence he amasses debunks many of the myths surrounding the tragedy.

Rather than writing a melodrama with clear heroes and villains, Lucas tells a more complex and more human story that details the fear, confusion, and disorder that accompanied the end of a brutal war. Lucas traces the damage not to a single blaze but to a series of fires—preceded by an equally unfortunate series of military and civilian blunders—that included the burning of cotton bales by fleeing Confederate soldiers.

This edition includes a new foreword by Anne Sarah Rubin, professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and the author of Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and America.
categories: Outdoors & Nature, Art & Photography, Environmental & Historic Preservation, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 136
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custom_title:
custom_subtitle:Ever Changing. Simply Amazing.
custom_byline1: Brookgreen Gardens
custom_byline2: introduction by Page Hayhurst Kiniry
foreword by Dick Rosen
with contributions by Robin R. Salmon
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custom_reviews:"Brookgreen Gardens is an enticing introduction for those who haven't visited yet and an immersive rediscovery for those who have. The book illustrates beautifully how sculpture, horticulture, and wildlife enhance each other—Brookgreen draws its unique spirit from all three—and how the Huntingtons thoughtfully foresaw this synergy long before other benefactors did."—Peter Trippi, editor-in-chief, Fine Art Connoisseur

"The photographs in Brookgreen Gardens sparkle and show the beauty of the art and the unique landscape, but more than that, they illuminate all the facets of Brookgreen, bringing you close so that they caress the sculpture and reveal the elegance of the trees and plantings."—Larry Lederman, author of Garden Portraits: Experiences of Natural Beauty

"Peaceful, thoughtful and beautiful, Brookgreen Gardens – simultaneously art museum, botanical garden and wildlife sanctuary – has something for everyone. Its thought-provoking, tranquil and playful elements help preserve and interpret aspects of the history and environment of the South Carolina Lowcountry and that of the Gullah Geechee people."—Amy Dempsey, author of Destination Art

"This book is a joy to read, and celebrates one of our nation's garden gems. A combination of public garden, wildlife sanctuary and art museum, Brookgreen Gardens is an extraordinary institution, a credit to the vision of its founders as well as the staff who continue to curate it with such great care. Among American cultural institutions, I would think that the word unique is an apt descriptor."—Michael J. Balick, vice president and director, Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden

"Brookgreen Gardens is one of the hidden jewels of America, a sanctuary that celebrates the full wonder of South Carolina, its history and culture, flora and fauna, spirit and imagination. Nature and the arts inspire us, bringing peace, joy, and solace, and the Huntington family's gift provides both a window into the past and a vista into the promise of a future informed by the beauty, tranquility, and glory of the natural world."—Wade Davis, University of British Columbia

"As a horticulturist and environmentalist, I've rejoiced in the Garden's removal of invasive species, the addition of more native plants and pollinator-friendly gardens, and the protection of timberlands. Brookgreen Gardens creatively highlights the conservation of art, the importance of historical accuracy, and the preservation of natural resources."—Amanda McNulty, host of Making it Grow
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content: An oasis of art and nature, Brookgreen Gardens is America's first public sculpture garden and largest collection of American figurative sculpture. Founded in 1931 by Archer Milton Huntington and Anna Hyatt Huntington, its lush South Carolina coastal location, between Myrtle Beach to the north and Charleston to the south, is an exquisite setting for the more than two thousand works by four hundred twenty-five artists—including more than one hundred sculptures and other works by Anna Huntington, many placed in the gardens she designed.

In 1984, Brookgreen was designated as a National Historic Landmark, highlighting the number of women sculptors whose work is presented in the collection, as well as the significance of the work of Anna Huntington. Today, Brookgreen has become a cultural institution unlike any other, blending sculpture, historic sites, botanical gardens, and the Lowcountry Zoo. As Brookgreen begins its ninetieth year, this volume celebrates the art, nature, and history ensconced in its 9,127 acres. More than one hundred color photographs; an introduction by president and CEO, Page Hayhurst Kiniry; and a foreword by its chairman of the board, Dick Rosen; bring Brookgreen Gardens to life on the page.
categories: World History, Southern History, African American Studies, Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World, ebook, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Commemorating the Denmark Vesey Affair and Black Radical Antislavery in the Atlantic World
custom_byline1: edited by James O'Neil Spady
custom_byline2: foreword by Manisha Sinha
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custom_author_blurb:James O'Neil Spady, associate professor of American history at Soka University of America, is the author of Education and the Racial Dynamics of Settler Colonialism in Early America: Georgia and South Carolina, 1700–1820.
custom_reviews:"Fugitive Movements is a thoughtful and wide-ranging volume exploring not just the 1822 Vesey conspiracy, but black antislavery and resistance across both time and place. The collection draws on new ways of framing Vesey and evidence from around the Atlantic World to inspire a broader understanding of the world of Vesey and his co-conspirators."—John Garrison Marks, author of Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery: Race, Status, and Identity in the Urban Americas
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content: In 1822, White authorities in Charleston, South Carolina, learned of plans among the city's enslaved population to lead an armed antislavery rebellion. Among the leaders was a free Black carpenter named Denmark Vesey. After a brief investigation and what many considered a dubious trial, Vesey and 35 others were convicted of attempted insurrection and hanged. To this day, activists, politicians, writers, and scholars have questioned and debated the historical significance of the conspiracy, its commemoration, and the integrity of the archival records left behind.

James O'Neil Spady has collected essays by 14 outstanding scholars, who reframe the Vesey affair as part of the broader development of Black Radical antislavery movements in the Atlantic World. Essays focus on Vesey and several other rebellion events, including the forcible rescue of African Americans being trafficked within the United States.

Manisha Sinha, James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History at the University of Connecticut and author of The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition, provides the foreword.
categories: Cooking & Culinary History, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 336
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custom_byline1: Recipes Gathered by Blanche S. Rhett
custom_byline2: Edited by Lettie Gay
Introduction and Explanatory Matter by Helen Woodward
Foreword to the 1976 Edition by Elizabeth Hamilton
Foreword to the New Edition by Rebecca Sharpless
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custom_author_blurb:Blanche S. Rhett (1876–1942) was the wife of R. Goodwyn Rhett, the fiftieth mayor of Charleston, South Carolina. They lived in the historic John Rutledge House until his death in 1939.
custom_reviews:"Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking should appeal to people who enjoy cooking and to lovers of the old city. . . . Not only does the cookbook give a richness of recipes but it also gives colorful and descriptive views of the atmosphere of Charleston in days past."—The State (Columbia, SC)

"The reader is transported into a long-gone leisurely era. . . . Yet one thing remains unchanged: the appreciation of good food gracefully served."—News and Courier (Charleston, SC)

"Here is a book that makes you hungry, not only for shrimp pilau and hoe cake, but for adventure and out-of-the-way places. After eating you want to stroll along the old streets of Charleston, study the iron-grilled porches and smell the flower gardens. For there is atmosphere in this volume, as well as information and glamour."—New York Telegram

"Like many other good cooks, Charleston cooks know no rules nor measures but cook by instinct and a real knowledge of cookery. So this collection of authentic receipts was no easy task to collect."—Augusta Chronicle (Ga.)
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content: First published in 1930 as 200 Years of Charleston Cooking, this collection of more than three hundred recipes was gathered by Blanche S. Rhett from housewives and their African American cooks in Charleston, South Carolina. From enduring favorites like she-crab soup and Hopping John to forgotten delicacies like cooter (turtle) stew, the recipes Rhett collected were full of family secrets but often lacked precise measurements. With an eye to precision that characterized home economics in the 1930s, Rhett engaged Lettie Gay, director of the Home Institute at the New York Herald Tribune, to interpret, test, and organize the recipes in this book.

Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking is replete with southern charm and detailed instructions on preparing the likes of shrimp with hominy, cheese straws, and sweet potato pie not to mention more than one hundred pages of delightful cakes and candies.

In a new foreword, Rebecca Sharpless, professor of history and author of Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960, provides historical and social context for understanding this groundbreaking book in the 21st century.
categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 426
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custom_subtitle:Supplement, 1834-1870
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
custom_byline2: with contributions by Alexander Moore
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 604
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custom_subtitle:1867-1870
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 678
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custom_subtitle:1858-1866
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 598
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custom_subtitle:1850-1857
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 648
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custom_subtitle:1845-1849
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 616
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custom_subtitle:1830-1844
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant, Alfred Taylor Odell, and T. C. Duncan Eaves
custom_byline2: introduction by Donald Davidson
with contributions by Alexander S. Salley
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categories: Cultural Studies & Sociology, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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Pages: 328
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader
custom_byline1: edited by Rebecca Fox and Robert L. Paquette
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custom_author_blurb:Rebecca Fox, chief of staff to the president at the University of Miami, holds a Ph.D. in history from Bryn Mawr College. Formerly senior associate vice president for university advancement at the University of Rochester and headmistress at Baltimore's Bryn Mawr School, Fox is Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's sister.

Robert L. Paquette is cofounder of the Alexander Hamilton Institute for the Study of Western Civilization in Clinton, New York, the author of Sugar Is Made with Blood (winner of the Elsa Goveia Prize for the best book in Caribbean history), and coeditor of The Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas.
custom_reviews:"Honoring a deceased colleague can be a labor of love as well as scholarship. Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader accomplishes this balance admirably through sixteen selected writings of Fox-Genovese and ten remembrances of her from an accomplished group of scholars. One result of this worthy project is to position Fox-Genovese for comparison with other scholars and commentators on women—from Southern historians Drew Faust and Florence King to theoretical historian Griselda Pollock to international analysts Juker Tati Imam Muhni, Miriam Cook, Ernestine Friedl, Louly Konz, Catherine Bateson, Claire Raymond, and Johnetta Cole. Through important works like this one, Fox-Genovese's viewpoints continue to enrich the study of women and related topics in the South and beyond. We should be deeply grateful to general editor David Moltke-Hansen and to the editors of this remarkable volume."—Dr. James Peacock, Kenan Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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content: History and Women, Culture and Faith is a five-volume collection of eighty essays and journal articles spanning the extraordinary intellectual career of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese (1941-2007). A working scholar for more than three decades, Fox-Genovese made significant contributions to European and Southern American history and became one of the most provocative scholars and educators of her time as she evolved intellectually from a Marxist to a feminist to a pro-life Roman Catholic. Although she authored or coauthored many well-received books, her prolific output as an essayist is less well known. This multivolume collection celebrates the scope of her scholarship and invites a fresh assessment of her legacy and influence.

Concluding this multivolume series of Fox-Genovese's fugitive works, Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader draws on earlier volumes in the series to provide an overview of fundamental intellectual concerns that shaped her writings. Divided into two parts—sixteen essays written by Fox-Genovese and ten remembrances of her life—the contents of this volume demonstrate her remarkable range of subjects, methods, and audiences as she examined both historical and contemporary issues.

The volume at the same time reflects persistent issues and themes running through Fox-Genovese's work, and her life journey from Marxism and feminism to Roman Catholicism. As her perspectives evolved, Fox-Genovese reexamined and refined previous arguments about many of these issues and themes: power imbalances for marginalized populations, the rise of bourgeois hegemony, Lockean individualism and liberalism, feminism, religion, and a moral economy.

Remembrances of Fox-Genovese, written by colleagues and former students, conclude the book. Providing insight into her personal and professional relationships, these remarkable accounts allow the reader to understand better the woman behind the nuanced and thought-provoking essays.

Demonstrated through her own words and in the remembrances, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's life reflected more continuity than change. Her legacy is a remarkable wealth of academic knowledge, vigorous and complex moral arguments, and, most of all, a life lived searchingly through her embrace of a deep, abiding faith that defined her scholarship and personal life.
categories: Southern History, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Explorations and Commitments: Religion, Faith, Culture
custom_byline1: edited by Ann Hartle and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose
custom_byline2: foreword by Mark A. Noll
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custom_author_blurb:Ann Hartle, professor of philosophy at Emory University, has published books and articles on topics in the history of philosophy and on the nature of philosophy and of human being.

Shelia O'Connor-Ambrose earned a Ph.D. in women's studies from Emory University, where she studied with Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. Editor of Fox-Genovese's posthumously published Marriage: The Dream That Refuses to Die, Connor-Ambrose is a fellow of the Alexander Hamilton Institute in Clinton, New York.
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content: Following Fox-Genovese's lifelong discourse concerning the individual and the community, Volume 4, Explorations and Commitments: Religion, Faith, and Culture, contains twenty-five essays that document her migration from a secular historian's understanding of religion to a view of faiths informed by her conversion to Roman Catholicism. Throughout her journey, Fox-Genovese firmly asserted that the church offered past and present protection to culture against the excesses of modernity by advocating the sanctity of life, preserving the importance of the family, and respecting genuine community.

Mirroring Fox-Genovese's recognition of the importance of religion to the development of history and the underpinnings of a common culture, this volume begins with a series of essays examining the value of studying religion through a historical lens. Even prior to her conversion, Fox-Genovese's personal blending of Marxism and feminism led her to become an advocate for the sanctity of human life, believing that abortion was the abhorrent nadir of a society that valued economic gain, individual freedom from responsibility, and untrammeled personal liberty over natural human relationships. When Fox-Genovese converted to Catholicism in 1995, she refined many of the previous themes that had characterized her lifelong work to reflect the fulfillment of a Christian sense of community, faith, feminine and familial identity, and culture. The essays in this volume provide an intimate perspective to Fox-Genovese's faith transformation as she investigated a variety of literary, philosophical, economic, and sociopolitical issues.

Volume 4 also includes a foreword by Mark A. Noll, the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame and author of America's God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln and The Civil War as a Theological Crisis.
categories: Southern History, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Intersections: History, Culture, Ideology
custom_byline1: edited by David Moltke-Hansen
custom_byline2: foreword by Thomas L. Pangle
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custom_author_blurb:David Moltke-Hansen is coeditor of Cambridge Studies on the American South and director of the digital William Gilmore Simms editions at the University of South Carolina. For more than thirty years, he has built and managed historical collections and programs at the South Carolina Historical Society, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Historical Society of Pennsylvania.
custom_reviews:"Both the analytical brilliance and the extraordinary erudition and range of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese are amply demonstrated in this remarkable collection. Underpinning all of the essays, however diverse, is the author's moral clarity and search for the common good. Intersections offers a wonderful entrée to the work of one of the great intellectuals of our time. Thomas L. Pangle's provocative foreword and David Moltke-Hansen's excellent introduction on Fox-Genovese as essayist further enhance the collection's appeal."—Peter A. Coclanis, Albert R. Newsome Distinguished Professor of History, UNC-Chapel Hill
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content: History and Women, Culture and Faith is a five-volume collection of eighty essays and journal articles spanning the extraordinary intellectual career of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese (1941-2007). A working scholar for more than three decades, Fox-Genovese made significant contributions to European and southern American history and became one of the most provocative scholars and educators of her time as she evolved from a Marxist to a feminist to a prolife Roman Catholic. Although she authored or coauthored ten well-received books, her prolific output as an essayist is less well known. This multivolume collection celebrates the scope of her scholarship and invites a fresh assessment of her legacy and influence.

Offering entry into Fox-Genovese's most enduring concerns throughout her lifetime, Volume 3, Intersections: History, Culture, Ideology, challenges readers to examine with the author the emergence of bourgeois hegemony and relationships of gender, class, and power through a series of eighteen reflective essays. Written over the course of three decades, and including Fox-Genovese's first published essay, this volume integrates often conflicting models of thought—Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism—to dissect power relationships and other social mechanisms that create human culture.

Incorporating examples from eighteenth-century French and Southern American history, Fox-Genovese dissects the emergence of and threats to a common culture, guided by the growth of bourgeois social forces, capitalism, and feminism. The essays begin with a critique of French Physiocratic economics and its application to European power structures. Additional essays survey a range of topics from literary analysis of Southern intellectuals such as Augusta Jane Evans Wilson and Henry Timrod to threats of multiculturalism to the teaching of an expanded and revised Western civilization "canon." Seeking to identify cultural standards and familial relationships in an early modern society, Fox-Genovese examines the commodification of the individual woman with "The Empress's New Clothes: The Politics of Fashion." The commodification of "motherhood" and "sisterhood" is further explored within additional essays.

Fox-Genovese's focus on large social questions and the theoretical underpinnings and consequences of different approaches to those questions, combined with her range of subjects, provides readers with distinctive and enduring scholarship.

Volume 3 also includes a foreword by Thomas L. Pangle, the Joe R. Long Chair in Democratic Studies in the Department of Government at the University of Texas and the codirector of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas.
categories: Southern History, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Ghosts and Memories: White and Black Southern Women's Lives and Writings
custom_byline1: edited by Kibibi Mack-Shelton and Christina Bieber Lake
custom_byline2: foreword by Mark Bauerlein
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custom_author_blurb:One of Fox-Genovese's former students, Kibibi Mack-Shelton was previously the Tyler and Alice Haynes Professor at the University of Richmond. She is the author of Parlor Ladies and Ebony Drudges: African American Women, Class, and Work in a South Carolina Community and Ahead of Her Time in Yesteryear: Geraldyne Pierce Zimmerman Comes of Age in a Southern African American Family.

Christina Bieber Lake, also one of Fox-Genovese's former students, is an associate professor of English at Wheaton College and the author of The Incarnational Art of Flannery O'Connor.
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content: Written between the 1970s and the early twenty-first century, the fifteen pioneering essays in Ghosts and Memories share in decoding and contextualizing the writings and history of white and black southern women. In these essays Elizabeth Fox-Genovese moves beyond literary criticism to give illuminating historical context to the ways that slavery, race, and gender shaped—and were shaped by—the lives and writingsof her subjects from the late-eighteenth century into the twentieth. As a result Fox-Genovese provides readers interpretations and perspectives that at once challenge and transform conventional stereotypes that frame our ideas about women's roles in Southern history and about texts reflecting on those roles.

Fox-Genovese's essays in this and other volumes provoke thought and insight with their combination of clarity and subtlety. Here she illuminates books out of the Harlem Renaissance by Zora Neale Hurston and out of Civil War-era Alabama by Augusta Jane Evans Wilson. And her keen assessments of autobiographies of white activist Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin and black poet and activist Maya Angelou still resonate as fresh and powerful readings. Even the fictional character Scarlett O'Hara looks strikingly different under Fox-Genovese's gaze. Scholars will find this volume a window on aspects of understudied subjects and also an opportunity to engage in the challenges of reading and interpreting powerful texts created from psychologically and historically fraught circumstances.

Volume 2 also includes a foreword by Mark Bauerlein, professor of English at Emory University and author of Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906.
categories: Southern History, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:The African American Experience at the University of South Carolina
custom_byline1: edited by Robert Greene II and Tyler D. Parry
custom_byline2: foreword by Valinda W. Littlefield
afterword by Henrie Monteith Treadwell
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custom_author_blurb:Robert Greene II is assistant professor of history at Claflin University.

Tyler D. Parry is assistant professor of African American and African diaspora studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
custom_reviews:"This groundbreaking and insightful volume is filled with rich and dynamic stories of how Black people shaped the University of South Carolina from its founding to the present. It masterfully illuminates the interconnection of race and education in the American South."—Keisha N. Blain, co-editor of #1 NYT bestseller 400 Souls

"This thoughtful collection of essays tells an important story. Invisible No More is a significant contribution to the history of the University of South Carolina."—Walter Edgar, author of South Carolina: A History

"Invisible No More powerfully centers Black lives in shaping the University of South Carolina before 1865, to a brief Reconstruction-era integration, through the age of segregation, and into the twenty-first century. This essential volume represents an exciting contribution to a growing field rethinking how we understand universities in American society."—Kirt von Daacke, University of Virginia

"Moving chronologically from slavery to present day, Invisible No More provides an overview of African American experiences at the University of South Carolina. This thought-provoking work is a must-read for higher education professionals, in the U.S. and abroad, who are grappling with their complex histories and who wish to tell these stories."—Jody Lynn Allen, William & Mary
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content: Invisible No More details the long and complex history of people of African descent at South Carolina's flagship university. Essays by twelve scholars explore a broad range of topics, from an examination of the lives of the enslaved men and women who lived and worked on the campus, to the first desegregation during the Reconstruction era, and continuing through the famous 1963 desegregation of the school and its long aftermath. This is the first single volume to examine the presence of Black people at a state university during the eras of slavery, Reconstruction, Civil Rights, Black Power, and Black Lives Matter.

A foreword is provided by Valinda W. Littlefield, associate professor of history and African American studies at the University of South Carolina. Henrie Monteith Treadwell, research professor of community health and preventative medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine and one of the first three African American students to attend the university in the twentieth century, provides an afterword.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, U.S. History, African American Studies, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:The Execution of George Junius Stinney Jr. and the Making of a Tragedy in the American South
custom_byline1: Eli Faber
custom_byline2: foreword by Carol Berkin
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custom_author_blurb:Eli Faber (1943–2020) was professor of history and dean of undergraduate studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York when he retired in 2010. He was the author of A Time for Planting: The First Migration, 1654–1820 and Jews, Slaves, and the Slave Trade: Setting the Record Straight.
custom_reviews:"A compact, jolting account of the shameful execution of a 14-year-old Black boy in the Jim Crow South. . . . An unsettling yet important historical excavation and true-crime narrative."—Kirkus Reviews [starred review]

"a gripping, tirelessly researched account of this significant case, and a cautionary tale that still resonates today."—Booklist

"There are many death penalty books, but few area are as compelling and heart breaking as this one. The Child in the Electric Chair offers readers a vivid portrait of a southern, company town, a heinous crime, threats of lynching, a broken legal system, and the cruel execution of a child. The writing is wonderful, the story is heart- breaking, and no one will finish the book without being deeply moved."—Austin Sarat, Amherst College

"Culminating meticulous research, Faber has exposed how at every level 14-year old George Stinney, Jr. was egregiously deprived of due process. Charged with killing two preteen White girls, he suffered hideous treatment within Jim Crow justice."—William B. Gravely, author of They Stole Him Out of Jail: Willie Earle, South Carolina's Last Lynching Victim

"Eli Faber has written a moving narrative of young George Stinney's execution that illuminates a larger story of racial injustice and political malfeasance in the Jim Crow South. This is a meticulously researched history, told with great thoughtfulness and clarity."—Amy Louise Wood, author of Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940
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content: At 7:30 a.m. on June 16, 1944, George Junius Stinney Jr. was escorted by four guards to the death chamber. Wearing socks but no shoes, the 14-year-old Black boy walked with his Bible tucked under his arm. The guards strapped his slight, five-foot-one-inch frame into the electric chair. His small size made it difficult to affix the electrode to his right leg and the face mask, which was clearly too large, fell to the floor when the executioner flipped the switch. That day, George Stinney became, and today remains, the youngest person executed in the United States during the twentieth century.

How was it possible, even in Jim Crow South Carolina, for a child to be convicted, sentenced to death, and executed based on circumstantial evidence in a trial that lasted only a few hours? Through extensive archival research and interviews with Stinney's contemporaries—men and women alive today who still carry distinctive memories of the events that rocked the small town of Alcolu and the entire state—Eli Faber pieces together the chain of events that led to this tragic injustice.

The first book to fully explore the events leading to Stinney's death, The Child in the Electric Chair offers a compelling narrative with a meticulously researched analysis of the world in which Stinney lived—the era of lynching, segregation, and racist assumptions about Black Americans. Faber explains how a systemically racist system, paired with the personal ambitions of powerful individuals, turned a blind eye to human decency and one of the basic tenets of the American legal system that individuals are innocent until proven guilty.

As society continues to grapple with the legacies of racial injustice, the story of George Stinney remains one that can teach us lessons about our collective past and present. By ably placing the Stinney case into a larger context, Faber reveals how this case is not just a travesty of justice locked in the era of the Jim Crow South but rather one that continues to resonate in our own time.

A foreword is provided by Carol Berkin, Presidential Professor of History Emerita at Baruch College at the City University of New York and author of several books including Civil War Wives: The Lives and Times of Angelina Grimke Weld, Varina Howell Davis, and Julia Dent Grant.
categories: paperback, ebook, Books, South Carolina History & Culture, Travelogue & Essays,
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custom_byline1: Robert N. Rosen
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custom_author_blurb:Robert Rosen, a third-generation Charlestonian, practices law on historic Broad Street. A trial lawyer and partner in The Rosen Law Firm, he is the author of Confederate Charleston: An Illustrated History of the City and People during the Civil War, The Jewish Confederates, and Saving the Jews: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Holocaust.
custom_reviews:"Sprightly and entertaining... Robert Rosen has captured the flavor and flair of Charleston as few writers have been able to do."—The Post & Courier

"Rosen is alert to the ironies and idiosyncrasies of his native city, and he writes of personalities and events with an easy, knowing hand, neither boastfully nor regretfully."—The State

"While the history of Charleston has been told many times before, it's not often been rendered so wryly, briskly, or affectionately as by author Robert Rosen in his A Short History of Charleston: Revised and Expanded Edition. His lively and fast-paced book—at just over 200 pages with numerous black-and-white illustrations—succinctly sums up nearly 350 years, spanning the city's proprietary past to its present incarnation as a tourist destination dependent on (and finally coming to terms with) its past."—Charleston Magazine
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content: A Short History of Charleston—a lively chronicle of the South's most renowned and charming city—has been hailed by critics, historians, and especially Charlestonians as authoritative, witty, and entertaining. Beginning with the founding of colonial Charles Town and ending three hundred and fifty years later in the present day, Robert Rosen's fast-paced narrative takes the reader on a journey through the city's complicated history as a port to English settlers, a bloodstained battlefield, and a picturesque vacation mecca. Packed with anecdotes and enlivened by passages from diaries and letters, A Short History of Charleston recounts in vivid detail the port city's development from an outpost of the British Empire to a bustling, modern city.

This revised and expanded edition includes a new final chapter on the decades since Joseph Riley was first elected mayor in 1975 through its rapid development in geographic size, population, and cultural importance. Rosen contemplates both the city's triumphs and its challenges, allowing readers to consider how Charleston's past has shaped its present and will continue to shape its future.
categories: Southern History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 192
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custom_byline1: edited by Valinda W. Littlefield
custom_byline2: foreword by Walter Edgar
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custom_author_blurb:Valinda W. Littlefield is an associate professor of history and the director of African American studies at the University of South Carolina. She is a coeditor of South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times and a contributor to Becoming Southern Writers: Essays in honor of Charles Joyner and The Routledge History of the American South.
custom_reviews:"an exciting entry point for those interested in women's history. The entries found in the book cover a wide range of time and activities, making this an excellent resource for those looking for comprehensive coverage of how women were involved in making the history of South Carolina This work would find a welcome home in history collections available to both scholars and the public."—South Carolina Libraries
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content: Prior to the twenty-first century, most historical writing about women in South Carolina focused on elite White women, even though working-class women of diverse backgrounds were actively engaged in the social, economic, and political battles of the state. Although often unrecognized publicly, they influenced cultural and political landscapes both within and outside of the state's borders through their careers, writing, art, music, and activism. Despite significant cultural, social, and political barriers, these brave and determined women affected sweeping change that advanced the position of women as well as their communities.

The entries in 101 Women Who Shaped South Carolina, which include many from the landmark text The South Carolina Encyclopedia, offer a concise and approachable history of the state, while recognizing the sacrifice, persistence, and sheer grit of its heroines and history makers.

A foreword is provided by Walter Edgar, Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina.
categories: Cooking & Culinary History, Gift Ideas, paperback, ebook, New & Noteworthy, Books, South Carolina History & Culture, Travelogue & Essays,
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custom_subtitle:Southern Recipes, Sweet Remembrances, and a Little Rambunctious Behavior
custom_byline1: Mary Martha Greene
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custom_author_blurb:Mary Martha Greene is a South Carolina native and government relations consultant who perfected her entertaining skills for making friends and engaging clients during her forty-year career. Now as a volunteer, she teaches cooking skills to at-risk and homeless youth.
custom_reviews:"I've been trying to decide whether to cook and then read or read and then cook, because either way is tempting. Having eaten my way through an entire recipe of her cheese biscuits I can attest to the recipes. Just be careful you don't get so engrossed in the stories you let something burn."—Nathalie Dupree, author of Nathalie Dupree's Favorite Stories and Recipes

"Whether it's on the front porch or at the kitchen table, Southerners seem to relish a good story — almost as much as our beloved biscuits. Although packed with mouth-watering Southern recipes, The Cheese Biscuit Queen Tells All is far more than a cookbook. It is a lovely collection of food memories that embody the best in how we connect and communicate as humans, by sharing and telling stories. You'll come for classic Southern recipes and stay for the tales."—Virginia Willis, chef and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author

"Mary Greene's cheese biscuits are the best I've ever had! I highly recommend the book for delightful reading and recipes."—Mary Alice Monroe, New York Times bestselling author of On Ocean Boulevard

"It's hard to decide what's more delicious in this food memoir/cookbook, the drool-worthy recipes or the delightful stories that accompany them. If the story of the garden club gone astray doesn't make you laugh out loud, I owe you a tin of cheese biscuits!"—Cassandra King, author of Tell Me a Story: My Life with Pat Conroy

"This book is so much more than a collection of recipes . . . it's a series of stories that Southerners—and those not blessed to be from the South—will relish. Bless their hearts."—Lynn and Cele Seldon, travel journalists

"It's rare when a writer so fully reveals herself on the page. This is what Mary Martha Greene has done. You will know who she is through her recipes and stories."—Bren McClain, author of One Good Mama Bone

"Much more than a cookbook, Mary Martha Green's The Cheese Biscuit Queen Tells All is an invitation and reference guide on southern hospitality... Mary Martha Greene shares her joy of cooking and entertaining and invites the reader to use the recipes to start their own traditions."—Southeastern Librarian
custom_awards:Listen to Mary Martha Greene on South Carolina State Library's Library Voices SC podcast
content: Some Southern cooks keep their prized family recipes under lock and key, but not Mary Martha Greene. Why? She says few things can truly be kept secret in the South and recipes, like cheese biscuits, are meant to be shared. That's why she's the "Cheese Biscuit Queen."

So many stories could be written about Greene's Aunt Mimi's cheese biscuits—the countries they visited, and the lies, half-truths, cheating, and conniving of small children (not to mention grown adults) to get them. For Greene, who inherited the title of Cheese Biscuit Queen—and the recipe—from her aunt, making the biscuits and continuing to share Aunt Mimi's recipe keeps her love and legacy alive.

In The Cheese Biscuit Queen Tells All, Greene, a South Carolinian and former lobbyist, pairs more than one hundred tried-and-true recipes for dishes like country ham scones, Frogmore stew dip, shrimp and corn pie, and lemon pound cake with stories from her corner of the South. The book opens with the famous cheese biscuit recipe (complete with family secrets), and the pages that follow brim with fabulous characters, antic-filled anecdotes, and recipes so good they might just call for a change in State House rules (true story).

With new ideas for the consummate entertainer, helpful tips for less experienced cooks, and stories to make even the grumpiest legislator laugh, The Cheese Biscuit Queen Tells All has a place in every kitchen. Great food leads to great memories, and with Mary Martha Greene by your side, even everyday meals can become memorable occasions.
categories: Southern History, U.S. History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Kinship, Empire, and Revolution in the Eighteenth-Century Muscogee World
custom_byline1: Bryan C. Rindfleisch
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custom_author_blurb:Bryan C. Rindfleisch is an assistant professor of history at Marquette University. He is the author of George Galphin's Intimate Empire: The Creek Indians, Family, and Colonialism in Early America.
custom_reviews:"Brothers of Coweta is both a history of Muscogee people living in the long eighteenth century and an incisive investigation into the power of kinship and family to shape Native politics, British policy, and American expansion. Through the lives and political savvy of two Native brothers, Sempoyaffee and Escotcha, Rindfleisch uncovers intimate and seldom told stories about violence and resilience that transformed the early American South."—Alejandra Dubcovsky, University of California, Riverside

"In elegant prose, Bryan Rindfleish offers a new perspective on Muscogee (Creek) history through the lens of kinship, family, and town as he traces the lives two of the best-known Creek micos of the eighteenth century. Thoroughly researched and filled with insight, the author has delivered another compelling addition to Muscogee (Creek) historiography."—Kathryn H. Braund, Auburn University
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content: In Brothers of Coweta Bryan C. Rindfleisch explores how family and clan served as the structural foundation of the Muscogee (Creek) Indian world through the lens of two brothers, who emerged from the historical shadows to shape the forces of empire, colonialism, and revolution that transformed the American South during the eighteenth century.

Although much of the historical record left by European settlers was fairly robust, it included little about Indigenous people and even less about their kinship, clan, and familial dynamics. However, European authorities, imperial agents, merchants, and a host of other individuals left a surprising paper trail when it came to two brothers, Sempoyaffee and Escotchaby, of Coweta, located in what is now central Georgia. Though fleeting, their appearances in the archival record offer a glimpse of their extensive kinship connections and the ways in which family and clan propelled them into their influential roles negotiating with Europeans. As the brothers navigated the politics of empire, they pursued distinct family agendas that at times clashed with the interests of Europeans and other Muscogee leaders.

Despite their limitations, Rindfleisch argues that these archives reveal how specific Indigenous families negotiated and even subverted empire-building and colonialism in early America. Through careful examination, he demonstrates how historians of early and Native America can move past the limitations of the archives to rearticulate the familial and clan dynamics of the Muscogee world.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, African American Studies, Music & Theater, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:The Sound of Freedom and Protest in the South Carolina Sea Islands
custom_byline1: Eric Sean Crawford
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custom_author_blurb:Eric Sean Crawford is the director of the Charles W. Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies at Coastal Carolina University and holds a Ph.D. in musicology from the Catholic University of America. Crawford served as musical consultant for the Amazon series Underground Railroad and is featured in Henry Louis Gates's miniseries, The Black Church.
custom_reviews:"Gullah Spirituals is a superb combination of scholarly analysis, personal experience, and intuition. Crawford interviews elderly performers of Gullah spirituals about their life experiences and their music. This creative approach leads to sensitive insights into Gullah culture and the spirituals that have sustained Gullah people for generations."—J. Herman Blake, University of California, Santa Cruz

"Gullah Spirituals is a comprehensive and well-written history of the development of a genre of Black spirituals. Eric Sean Crawford has done a superb and authentic job of updating the available information on this special song form. The reader will find this book to be engaging writing and a must have for his/her library!"—Willis C. Patterson, University of Michigan

"Gullah Spirituals is an incisive, sweeping examination of a powerful, musical tradition... an engaging, accessible work of scholarship that also goes to great lengths to generously shine a bright spotlight on the remarkable Gullah Geechee men and women (past and present) on St. Helena Island who have safeguarded this spiritual repertoire."—Heather L. Hodges, Former Executive Director, Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
custom_awards:Listen to Eric Crawford on SC Public Radio's South Carolina Lede podcast
content: In Gullah Spirituals musicologist Eric Crawford traces Gullah Geechee songs from their beginnings in West Africa to their height as songs for social change and Black identity in the twentieth century American South. While much has been done to study, preserve, and interpret Gullah culture in the lowcountry and sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia, some traditions like the shouting and rowing songs have been all but forgotten. This work, which focuses primarily on South Carolina's St. Helena Island, illuminates the remarkable history, survival, and influence of spirituals since the earliest recordings in the 1860s.

Grounded in an oral tradition with a dynamic and evolving character, spirituals proved equally adaptable for use during social and political unrest and in unlikely circumstances. Most notably, the island's songs were used at the turn of the century to help rally support for the United States' involvement in World War I and to calm racial tensions between black and white soldiers. In the 1960s, civil rights activists adopted spirituals as freedom songs, though many were unaware of their connection to the island.

Gullah Spirituals uses fieldwork, personal recordings, and oral interviews to build upon earlier studies and includes an appendix with more than fifty transcriptions of St. Helena spirituals, many no longer performed and more than half derived from Crawford's own transcriptions. Through this work, Crawford hopes to restore the cultural memory lost to time while tracing the long arc and historical significance of the St. Helena spirituals.
categories: U.S. History, Memoir & Biography, African American Studies, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Conscience, Reason, and the Mind of Martin R. Delany
custom_byline1: Tunde Adeleke
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custom_author_blurb:Tunde Adeleke is a professor of history and director of the African and African American Studies Program at Iowa State University. He is the author of the critically acclaimed UnAfrican Americans: Nineteenth-Century Black Nationalists and the Civilizing Mission as well as numerous books and articles on Martin R. Delany.
custom_reviews:"In this perceptive study, Tunde Adeleke brings to light the diasporic contours of Delany's orbit and the fierce, perspicacious intellect of this nineteenth century Africana figure. The result is a judicious, riveting account of religion, race, politics, and the Africana struggle for freedom whose vectors Delaney embodied with complexity and brilliance. Adeleke has bequeathed a true gem for Africana studies and related disciplines."—Sylvester Johnson, Virginia Tech

"Adeleke shows that Delaney was alternatively a separatist, integrationist, militarist, and accommodationist before returning to his previous belief in emigration. Despite his changing methods, a puzzling belief in the power of moral suasion animated all of Delaney's emancipationist efforts."—Civil War Book Review
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content: Martin R. Delany (1812-1885) was one of the leading and most influential Black activists and nationalists in American history. His ideas have inspired generations of activists and movements, including Booker T. Washington in the late nineteenth century, Marcus Garvey in the early 1920s, Malcolm X and Black Power in 1960s, and even today's Black Lives Matter. Extant scholarship on Delany has focused largely on his Black nationalist and Pan-Africanist ideas. Tunde Adeleke argues that there is so much more about Delany to appreciate. In the Service of God and Humanity reveals and analyzes Delany's contributions to debates and discourses about strategies for elevating Black people and improving race relations in the nineteenth century.

Adeleke examines Delany's view of Blacks as Americans who deserved the same rights and privileges accorded Whites. While he spent the greater part of his life pursuing racial equality, his vision for America was much broader. Adeleke argues that Delany was a quintessential humanist who envisioned a social order in which everyone, regardless of race, felt validated and empowered.

Through close readings of the discourse of Delany's humanist visions and aspirations, Adeleke illuminates many crucial but undervalued aspects of his thought. He discusses the strategies Delany espoused in his quest to universalize America's most cherished of values—life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness—and highlights his ideological contributions to the internal struggles to reform America. The breadth and versatility of Delany's thought become more evident when analyzed within the context of his American-centered aspirations. In the Service of God and Humanity reveals a complex man whose ideas straddled many complicated social, political, and cultural spaces, and whose voice continues to speak to America today.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, U.S. History, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books,
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custom_subtitle:A Lifetime of Defiance and Protest
custom_byline1: Rolundus R. Rice
custom_byline2: foreword by Andrew Young
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custom_author_blurb:Rolundus Rice holds a PhD in history from Auburn University. He currently serves as vice president of academic affairs at Rust College in Mississippi.
custom_reviews:"Hosea Williams is the definitive study of one of America's most gifted civil rights activists and political mavericks. Rice brilliantly traces the pioneering path of the talented movement strategist and protest provocateur — from his legendary association with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Jesse Jackson, to his transformative work for the poor, and his sublime agitation as a uniquely styled politician. Rice's pathbreaking book rightly establishes Hosea Williams as one of the most colorful and creative personalities to emerge in the pitched battle to make America a just nation."—Michael Eric Dyson, author of Entertaining Race: Performing Blackness in America

"Rice's biography of civil rights icon Hosea Williams reveals vividly the strategic effectiveness of militant agitation and nonviolent civil disobedience for the cause of freedom, justice and equality in America. I witnessed firsthand within the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), the courage and the precision of Hosea Williams's frontline leadership and activism which this biography illuminates."—Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Executive Producer and Host of PBS' The Chavis Chronicles

"Hosea Williams offers a full, accessible, and clearly written account of was one of the most critical yet unknown figures in the modern civil rights movement. A welcome addition that offers a distinctive window onto the most important American social movement in the twentieth century."—James Ralph, author of Northern Protest: Martin Luther King, Jr., Chicago, and the Civil Rights Movement
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content: When civil rights leader Hosea Lorenzo Williams died in 2000, U.S. Congressman John Lewis said of him, "Hosea Williams must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new America. Through his actions, he helped liberate all of us."

In this first comprehensive biography of Williams, Rolundus Rice demonstrates the truth in Lewis's words and argues that Williams's activism in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was of central importance to the success of the larger civil rights movement. Rice traces Williams's journey from a local activist in Georgia to a national leader and one of Martin Luther King Jr.'s chief lieutenants. He helped plan the Selma-to-Montgomery march and walked shoulder-to-shoulder with Lewis across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on "Bloody Sunday." While his hard-charging tactics were counter to the diplomatic approach of other SCLC leaders, Rice argues that it was this contrast in styles that made the organization successful.

Andrew Young Jr., former SCLC executive director, U.S. Congressman, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and mayor of Atlanta, provides a foreword.
categories: Southern History, U.S. History, Environmental & Historic Preservation, Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Race, Equity, and the Practice of Public History
custom_byline1: edited by Leah Worthington, Rachel Clare Donaldson, and John W. White
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custom_author_blurb:Leah Worthington is co-director of the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative and associate director of the Lowcountry Digital Library at the College of Charleston.

Rachel Clare Donaldson is an assistant professor of public history at the College of Charleston and author of "I Hear America Singing": Folk Music and National Identity.

John W. White, founding director of the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative and dean of libraries at the College of Charleston, is coeditor of Laying the Foundation: Digital Humanities in Academic Libraries.
custom_reviews:"Much of the history we need is hidden in plain sight, but these essays open the research and results of the hard–working stewards of the raw material of history—archivists, archaeologists, architectural historians, and historic site administrators—who are creating the broader, more inclusive history our times need."—Carter L. Hudgins, Director Emeritus, Clemson University / College of Charleston Graduate Program in Historic Preservation

"Challenging History is a refreshing addition to conversations about Black history in the public history sphere. It challenges us to move beyond simply highlighting deficiencies and inspires solutions. It elevates significant stories, illustrates "real-world" improvements, and makes unflinching assessments—marking where we have been, have yet to go, and how we might get there."—Shawn Halifax, Public History Practitioner, McLeod Plantation Historic Site

"Challenging History is a book for our times. Creatively weaving together diverse case studies, it shows how southern public history is enriched by including the African American experience. In demonstrating how "imagined heritages" frequently distort historical understanding, it insightfully shows the challenges and opportunities public historians face reshaping our collective memory of the past."—Bernard Powers, Professor emeritus of history and founding director of the Center for the Study of Slavery at the College of Charleston
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content: For decades racism and social inequity have stayed at the center of the national conversation in the United States, sustaining the debate around public historic places and monuments and what they represent. These conversations are a reminder of the crucial role that public history professionals play in engaging public audiences on subjects of race and slavery. This "difficult history" has often remained un- or underexplored in our public discourse, hidden from view by the tourism industry, or even by public history professionals themselves, as they created historic sites, museums, and public squares based on white-centric interpretations of history and heritage.

Challenging History, through a collection of essays by a diverse group of scholars and practitioners, examines how difficult histories, specifically those of slavery and race in the United States, are being interpreted and inserted at public history sites and in public history work. Several essays explore the successes and challenges of recent projects, while others discuss gaps that public historians can fill at sites where Black history took place but is absent in the interpretation. Through case studies, the contributors reveal the entrenched false narratives that public history workers are countering in established public history spaces and the work they are conducting to reorient our collective understanding of the past.

History practitioners help the public better understand the world. Their choices help to shape ideas about heritage and historical remembrances and can reform, even transform, worldviews through more inclusive and ethically narrated histories. Challenging History invites public historians to consider the ethical implications of the narratives they choose to share and makes the case that an inclusive, honest, and complete portrayal of the past has the potential to reshape collective memory and ideas about the meaning of American history and citizenship.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, Reconstruction Era, Environmental & Historic Preservation, paperback, ebook, hardcover, New & Noteworthy, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Reckoning with Jim Crow Era Confederate Monuments
custom_byline1: Roger C. Hartley
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custom_author_blurb:Roger C. Hartley, a professor of law at the Catholic University of America, is an award-winning teacher of constitutional law and labor law. He is the author of three other books and dozens of articles in leading academic journals.
custom_reviews:"The fraught subject of Confederate monuments in prominent public spaces receives the most forthright, well-informed, and unemotional treatment in this book that I have encountered anywhere. Whether or not one agrees with Hartley's argument that these products of the Cult of the Lost Cause symbolizing slavery and White supremacy should be relocated to private land, museums, or Confederate cemeteries, the reader will understand the issue better than ever before."—James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

"Monuments to White supremacy have a deleterious impact on American society. Informed by historical accounts, the imperatives of racial justice, and his own legal expertise, Roger Hartley surveys the problematic presence of Confederate monuments in American public spaces and convincingly makes the case for their removal and relocation."—Erika Doss, author of Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America

"Constitutional law professor Roger Hartley's book is a clear and practical exploration of the Confederate monuments controversy. A law brief of sorts for the removal of the hundreds of Confederate statues that still stand, Monumental Harm compellingly argues that opponents should pay less attention to monument defenders' motives and instead focus on the very real harm that Confederate statues inflict on American society today. Hartley shows monument opponents how to make their case—and win."—Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, authors of Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy

"More than a history of Confederate monuments, Roger C. Hartley's Monumental Harm steers readers through some of the toughest questions in the debate over whether these monuments should remain or be removed. Anyone hoping to better understand this divisive debate will profit from reading this book."—Kevin M. Levin, author of Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War's Most Persistent Myth

"The problem of Confederate monuments has been the starting point for a national and international reconsideration of the memorial landscape. Roger C. Hartley's lucid analysis provides a valuable guide to addressing the legacy of the Lost Cause and a framework for thinking about protests against other public monuments."—Thomas J. Brown, author of Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America

"Monumental Harm is an important book. It deserves a readership beyond those who normally follow the emerging currents of Civil War historiography."—Civil War Times
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content: In recent years, the debate over the future of Confederate monuments has taken center stage and caused bitter clashes in communities throughout the American South. At the heart of the debate is the question of what these monuments represent. The arguments and counterarguments are formulated around sets of assumptions grounded in Southern history, politics, culture, and race relations. Comprehending and evaluating accurately the associated claims and counterclaims calls for a careful examination of facts and legal considerations relevant to each side's assertations. In Monumental Harm, Roger C. Hartley offers a road map to addressing and resolving this acrimonious debate.

Although history and popular memory play a vital role in the discussion, there have been distortions of both parts. Monumental Harm reviews the fact-based history of the initial raising of these monuments and distinguishes it from the popular memory held by many Confederate-monument supporters. Hartley also addresses concerns regarding the potential erasure of history and the harm these monuments have caused the African American community over the years, as well as the role they continue to play in politics and power.

The recent rise in White nationalism and the video-recorded murders of Black citizens at the hands of White police officers have led to nationwide demonstrations and increased scrutiny of Confederate monuments on public land. As injustice is laid bare and tempers flare, the need for a peaceful resolution becomes ever-more necessary. Monumental Harm offers a way to break the rhetorical deadlock, urging that we evaluate the issue through the lens of the U.S. Constitution while employing the overarching democratic principle that no right is absolute. Through constructive discourse and good-faith compromise, a more perfect union is within reach.
categories: Civil War, Reference & Guides, Civil Rights, American Revolution, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_byline1: compiled by Edwin Breeden
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custom_author_blurb:Edwin C. Breeden is the South Carolina Historical Marker Program coordinator and historian for the National Register of Historic Places for the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. He earned a Ph.D. in history from Rice University in Houston, Texas.
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content: The South Carolina Historical Marker Program, established in 1936, has approved the installation of more than 1,700 interpretive plaques, each highlighting how places both grand and unassuming have played important roles in the history of the Palmetto State. These roadside markers identify and interpret places valuable for understanding South Carolina's past, including sites of consequential events and buildings, structures, or other resources significant for their design or their association with institutions or individuals prominent in local, state, or national history.

This volume includes a concise history of the South Carolina Historical Marker Program and an overview of the marker application process. For those interested in specific historic periods or themes, the volume features condensed lists of markers associated with broader topics such as the American Revolution, African American history, women's history, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

While the program is administered by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, most markers are proposed by local organizations that serve as a marker's official sponsor, paying its cost and assuming responsibility for its upkeep. In that sense, this inventory is a record not just of places and subjects that the state has deemed worthy of acknowledgment, but of those that South Carolinians themselves have worked to enshrine.
categories: African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 192
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custom_byline1: edited by Bernard E. Powers, Jr.
custom_byline2: foreword by Walter Edgar
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custom_author_blurb:Bernard E. Powers, Jr., professor emeritus of history at the College of Charleston, was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston. He is the author of Black Charlestonians: A Social History 1822–1885 and coauthor of We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel. Powers is a founding board member and interim chief executive officer of the International African American Museum in Charleston.
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custom_awards:Listen to Bernard Powers on South Carolina State Library's Library Voices SC podcast
content: The first people of African descent to live in what is now South Carolina, enslaved people living in the sixteenth century Spanish settlements of San Miguel de Gualdape and Santa Elena, arrived even before the first permanent English settlement was established in 1670. For more than 350 years South Carolina's African American population has had a significant influence on the state's cultural, economic, and political development.

101 African Americans Who Shaped South Carolina depicts the long presence and profound influence people of African descent have had on the Palmetto State. Each entry offers a brief description of an individual with ties to South Carolina who played a significant role in the history of the state, nation, and, in some cases, world. Drawing upon the landmark text The South Carolina Encyclopedia, edited by Walter Edgar, the combined entries offer a concise and approachable history of the state and the African Americans who have shaped it.

A foreword is provided by Walter Edgar, Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina.
categories: Fiction & Folklore, paperback, ebook, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Grotesque Legends and Folk Tales of Old Charleston
custom_byline1: John H. Bennett, Jr.
custom_byline2: introduction by Julia Eichelberger
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custom_author_blurb:John Bennett (1865–1956) was a novelist, artist, essayist, and poet of international acclaim who played a fundamental role in the Charleston Renaissance. His other books include the beloved children's story Master Skylark: A Story of Shakespeare's Time and The Treasure of Peyre Gaillard.
custom_reviews:"A collection of folk story, myth, drolleries, macabre unreason . . . old tales of death, mystery, bizarre incredibilities, diabolic influence, demanding ghosts, buried treasure, enchantments, miracles, visitations, and the dead that are not dead."—Kirkus Reviews
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content: "You ask for a story. I will tell you one, fact for fact and true for true." So begins "Crook-Neck Dick," one of twenty-three stories in this beguiling collection of Charleston lore. John Bennett's interpretations of the legends shared with him by African-descended Charlestonians have entertained generations. Among them are tales of ghosts, conjuring, superhuman feats, and supernatural powers; accounts of ingenuity, humor, terror, mystery, and solidarity will enchant folklorists, students of Charleston history, and all those who love a good ghost story.

Julia Eichelberger, the Marybelle Higgins Howe Professor of Southern Literature and an executive board member of the Center for Study of Slavery at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, provides an introduction.
categories: Southern History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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Pages: 182
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custom_byline1: edited by Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, and C. James Taylor
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custom_author_blurb:Walter Edgar is the Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of South Carolina: A History, editor of The South Carolina Encyclopedia, and host of the radio program Walter Edgar's Journal.

J. Brent Morris is professor of history, chair of the Department of Humanities, and director of the Institute for the Study of the Reconstruction Era at the University of South Carolina Beaufort. He is the recipient of the 2010 Malcolm C. Clark Award of the South Carolina Historical Society and the 2018 Order of the South award by the Southern Academy of Letters, Arts, and Sciences.

C. James Taylor is the former editor in chief of the Adams Family Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. He is also a former associate research professor of history at the University of South Carolina and was coeditor of The Papers of Henry Laurens. He was coeditor with George C. Rogers Jr. of the second edition of A South Carolina Chronology.
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content: This third edition of A South Carolina Chronology offers a year-by-year chronology of landmark dates and events in South Carolina's recorded history. Unique to this volume are nearly thirty additional years of notable events and important updates to material covered in earlier editions. Historians Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, and C. James Taylor expand previously chronicled periods using a more contemporary view of race, gender, and other social issues, adding measurably to South Carolina's history.

While the previous edition referenced precontact South Carolina in a brief introduction, this edition begins with the chapter "Peopling the Continent (17,200 BCE-1669)." It acknowledges the extent to which the lands where Europeans began arriving in the fifteenth century had long been inhabited by indigenous people who were members of complex societies and sociopolitical networks.

An easy-to-use inventory of the people, politics, laws, economics, wars, protests, storms, and cultural events that have had a major influence on South Carolina and its inhabitants, this latest edition reflects a more complete picture of the state's past. From the earliest-known migrants to the increasingly complex global society of the early twenty-first century, A South Carolina Chronology offers a solid foundation for understanding the Palmetto State's past.
categories: Political Science, Rhetoric & Communication, Civil Rights, Studies in Rhetoric & Communication, paperback, ebook, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Five Civil Rights Sit-Ins and the Rhetoric of Protest
custom_byline1: edited by Sean Patrick O'Rourke and Lesli K. Pace
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custom_author_blurb:Sean Patrick O'Rourke is a professor of rhetoric and American studies and director of the Center for Speaking and Listening at Sewanee: The University of the South.

Lesli K. Pace is an associate professor of communication and program coordinator for the Communication Program at the University of Louisiana, Monroe.
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content: The social, political, and legal struggles that made up the American civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century produced and refined a wide range of rhetorical strategies and tactics. Arguably the most astonishing and certainly the least understood are the sit-in protests that swept the nation at the beginning of the 1960s. A companion to Like Wildfire: The Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Sit-Ins, this concentrated collection of essays examines the origins and rhetorical methods of five distinct civil rights sit-ins of 1960.

For students of rhetoric, protest, and sociopolitical movements, this volume demonstrates how we can read the sit-ins by using diverse rhetorical lenses as essentially persuasive conflicts in which participants invented and deployed arguments and actions in attempts to change segregated communities and the attitudes, traditions, and policies that maintained segregation.
categories: Literary Studies, Memoir & Biography, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison
custom_byline1: Geneva Cobb Moore
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custom_author_blurb:Geneva Cobb Moore is a professor of English, women's and gender studies, and race and ethnic studies at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She is a former Fulbright scholar at the University of Ghana in West Africa and has received grants and awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She has published articles on Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Forten Grimké, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and other writers. An adviser to Gale's Literature of Autobiographical Narrative, Moore has been a reviewer for Auto/Biography Studies.
custom_reviews:"Through the canvas of female bodies, Moore investigates how Morrison uses maternal power and representation to not only expose the racial inequities, violence, and oppression of Black bodies throughout United States history; but also how the trauma endured become physical representations of power, hope, and healing... Meticulously researched and documented, Moore has given us a detailed roadmap to not only better understand Morrison as an author, but also an activist and unflinching historian of America's dark and often whitewashed past."—South Carolina Libraries
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content: The first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison is one of the most celebrated women writers in the world. In Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison, Geneva Cobb Moore explores how Morrison uses parody and pastiche, semiotics and metaphors, and allegory to portray black life in the United States, teaching untaught history to liberate Americans.

In this short and accessible book, originally published as part of Moore's Maternal Metaphors of Power in African American Women's Literature, she covers each of Morrison's novels, from The Bluest Eye to Beloved to God Help the Child. With a new introduction and added coverage of Morrison's final book, The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations, Bodily Evidence is essential reading for scholars, students, and readers of Morrison's novels.
categories: Outdoors & Nature, paperback, ebook, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:Attacks on the Carolina Coast
custom_byline1: W. Clay Creswell
custom_byline2: foreword by Marie Levine
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custom_author_blurb:W. Clay Creswell has been a North and South Carolina region shark-bite investigator for the Shark Research Institute Global Shark Attack File since 2004. In this role he has become a trusted media resource for the National Geographic Channel's series When Sharks Attack and local television, newspaper, and online news outlets. Creswell is an environmental health program specialist with the Pender County Health Department in North Carolina.
custom_reviews:"Informative and at times spellbinding, Sharks in the Shallows is a unique, earnest, meticulously researched, engaging, and clearly written book about human-shark interactions, with the utmost respect for sharks. You won't find a better, more objective book on the topic."—Daniel C. Abel, author of Shark Biology and Conservation: Essentials for Educators, Students, and Enthusiasts

"Jawsome! Sharks in the Shallows offers a comprehensive look into the reality of interactions between sharks and humans based on scientific research, not fear or mythos. A practical, must have guide for scientists, swimmers, surfers and scuba divers who encounter a shark off the Carolina coastline. Rating, ten sharks teeth!"—Dean W. Fessler, Jr., Deputy Director, The Shark Research Institute

"The Carolinas have long been underappreciated as a hot spot for sharks. In this well-researched book, Clay Creswell brings the importance of the Carolinas into the spotlight, especially regarding interactions between sharks and people."—Charles Bangley, Fisheries Conservation Lab, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

"With more than 200 years of historical data, W. Clay Creswell's Sharks in the Shallows is a landmark publication for scientists and naturalists alike. It brings valuable insights into the indigenous shark species and their interactions with ocean users in North and South Carolina. Individual case histories and appropriate safety suggestions are provided for the reader to utilize. This book is a must for every ocean user."—Ralph S. Collier, president and founder, Shark Research Committee
custom_awards:Listen to Clay Creswell on South Carolina State Library's Library Voices SC podcast
content: Powerful and mysterious, sharks inspire both fascination and fear. Worldwide, oceans are home to some five-hundred species, and of those, fifty-six are known to reside in or pass through the waters off the coast of both North and South Carolina. At any given time, waders, swimmers, and surfers enjoying these waters are frequently within just one-hundred feet of a shark. While it's unnerving to know that sharks often swim just below the surface in the shallows, W. Clay Creswell, a shark-bite investigator for the Shark Research Institute's Global Shark Attack File, explains that attacks on humans are extremely rare. In 2019 the International Shark Attack File confirmed sixty-four unprovoked attacks on humans, including three in North Carolina and one in South Carolina.

While acknowledging that they pose real dangers to humans, Creswell believes the fear of sharks is greatly exaggerated. During his sixteen-year association with the Shark Research Institute, he has investigated more than one hundred shark-related incidents and has maintained a database of all shark-human encounters along the Carolina coastlines back to 1817. Creswell uses this data to expose the truth and history of this often-sensationalized topic.

Beyond the statistics related to attacks in the Carolina waters, Sharks in the Shallows offers a history of shark-human interactions and an introduction to the world of shark attacks. Creswell details the conditions that increase a person's chances of an encounter, profiles the three species most often involved in attacks, and reveals the months and time of day with the highest probability of an encounter. With a better understanding of sharks' responses to their environment, and what motivates them to attack humans, he hopes people will develop a greater appreciation of the invaluable role sharks play in our marine environment.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, Civil Rights, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: Thadious M. Davis
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custom_author_blurb:Thadious M. Davis, Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought, Emerita, and professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author or editor of 13 books, including Southscapes: Geographies of Race, Region, and Literature.
custom_reviews:"In Thadious Davis, Alice Walker has found an ideal reader, one who places the author and her work in personal, historical, and political contexts, one whose critical analysis reveals depth and meaning beyond the obvious, and one whose brilliance complements that of the writer."—Farah Jasmine Griffin, Columbia University

"This brilliant book provides a dazzlingly crystalline and panoramic portrait of Alice Walker's expansive body of work. It incorporates insights on Walker's biography, examining stages in her epic journey as a writer whose life and work have profoundly impacted the world and been devoted to helping its healing."—Riché Richardson, Cornell University

"Understanding Alice Walker is a succinct and searching study of Alice Walker's expansive corpus and evolving imagination. Thadious Davis provides her readers a comprehensive and illuminating overview of Walker's writings across multiple themes and genres, but also of the contexts—local and global—that have given it form."—Deborah McDowell, University of Virginia

"Davis reveals an immense scholarly patience with Alice Walker and her works, reading and discussing and analyzing them in a deep and well-organized reconstruction of the author's background against American history and events around the globe."—Geneva Cobb Moore, author of Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison
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content: Understanding Alice Walker serves both as an introduction to the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner's large body of work and as a critical analysis of her multifaceted canon. Thadious M. Davis begins with Walker's biography and her formative experiences in the South and then presents ways of accessing and reading Walker's complex, interconnected, and sociopolitically invested career in writing fiction, poetry, critical essays, and meditations.

Although best known for her novel The Color Purple and her landmark essays In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose, Walker began her career with Once: Poems, The Third Life of Grange Copeland, and In Love and Trouble: Stories of Black Women. She has remained committed not merely to writing in multiple genres but also to conveying narratives of the hope and transformation possible within the human condition and as visualized through the lens of race and gender.

Davis traces Walker's literary voice as it emerges from the civil rights and feminist movements to encourage an individual and collective search for justice and joy and then evolves into forceful advocacy for world peace, spiritual liberation, and environmental conservancy. Her writing, a rich amalgamation of the cutting-edge and popular, the new-age and difficult, continues to be paradigm shifting and among the most important produced in the last half of the twentieth century and among the most consistently prophetic in the first part of the twenty-first century.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: Thomas Fahy
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custom_author_blurb:Thomas Fahy is a professor of English and Director of English Graduate Studies at Long Island University Post. He has published numerous books including Dining with Madmen: Fat, Food, and the Environment in 1980s Horror; Understanding Truman Capote; Staging Modern American Life: Popular Culture in the Experimental Theatre of Millay, Cummings, and Dos Passos; and the edited collection Peering Behind the Curtain: Disability, Illness, and the Extraordinary Body in Contemporary Theatre.
custom_reviews:"Gain a deeper appreciation for the Pulitzer- and Tony-winning playwright of August: Osage County, Mary Page Marlow, The Minutes, and Linda Vista...Exploring Letts' emotional power and cultural commentary, Fahy presents one of the first books to offer an engaging analysis of the playwright."—Playbill

"More than an excellent and compelling analysis of the work of one of America's leading playwrights, a writer whose imagination takes him, and us, on journeys into the private and social tensions of America, Understanding Tracy Letts explores the wider literary and social context of works which have the power to disturb, amuse, unnerve, and even, perhaps, console"—Christopher Bigsby, author of Twenty-First Century American Playwrights and Arthur Miller 1962-2005

"Understanding Tracy Letts not only delves into crucial biographical details instrumental to Letts' development as a playwright but also engagingly places his works in dialogue with Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner, The X-Files, food theory, quilting, and masculine studies. Fahy's book is a long needed holistic look at one of America's most important playwrights."—William Boles, Rollins College
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content: Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in drama as well as Tony Awards for best play and best actor, Tracy Letts has emerged as one of the greatest playwrights of the twenty-first century. Understanding Tracy Letts, the first book dedicated to his writing, is an introduction to his plays and an invitation to engage more deeply with his work—both for its emotional power and cultural commentary.

Experiencing a Tracy Letts play often feels akin to reading a Cormac McCarthy novel, watching a Cohen Brothers film, and seeing an episode of Breaking Bad at the same time. His characters can be ruthlessly cruel and funny, selfish and generous, delusional and incisive, and deceptive and painfully honest. They keep secrets. They harbor biases and misconceptions. And in their quest to find love and understanding, they often end up being the greatest impediments to their own happiness. As a writer, Letts can move seamlessly from the milieu of a Texas trailer park to the pulsating nightlife of London's countercultural scene, the stifling quiet of small-town Ohio to the racial tensions of urban Chicago. He thrives in the one-act format, in plays like Mary Page Marlow and The Minutes, as well as the epic scope of August: Osage County and Linda Vista. With a musician's sense of timing, Letts shifts between humor and heartache, silence and sound, and the mundane and the poetic. And he fearlessly tackles issues such as gender bias, racism, homophobia, and disability rights. Contemporary American life thus becomes a way to comment on the country's troubled history from Native American genocide to the civil rights movement. The personal narratives of his characters become gateways to the political.

Understanding Tracy Letts celebrates the range of Letts's writing, in part, by applying different critical approaches to his works. Whether through the lens of disability studies, the conspiracy genre, food studies, the feminist politics of quilting, or masculinity studies, these readings help bring out the thematic richness and sociopolitical dimensions of Letts's work.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: Derek C. Maus
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custom_author_blurb:Derek C. Maus teaches contemporary literature at the State University of New York at Potsdam. He is also the author of Jesting in Earnest: Percival Everett and Menippean Satire and Unvarnishing Reality: Subversive Russian and American Cold War Satire. He is also the editor or coeditor of Conversations with Colson Whitehead; Post-Soul Satire: Black Identity after Civil Rights; Finding a Way Home: A Critical Assessment of Walter Mosley's Fiction; and Angry Rain: A Memoir by Maurice Kenny.
custom_reviews:"With Understanding Colson Whitehead, Derek Maus offers an invaluable, readable, and comprehensive introduction to the work of one of the current era's most important authors. Few writers have shifted genres, styles, and tones so masterfully, and Maus helps readers understand how Whitehead's work all fits together."—Cameron Leader-Picone, Kansas State University

"Understanding Colson Whitehead is an indispensable study about an incredibly inventive contemporary novelist. Derek C. Maus produces superb and meticulous analyses of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, The Underground Railroad, and Whitehead's other books. This engaging examination advances our views of an author whose idiosyncratic novels captured the attention of countless readers and earned astonishing levels of critical acclaim."—Howard Rambsy II, Author of Bad Men: Creative Touchstones of Black Writers
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content: In 2020 Colson Whitehead became the youngest recipient of the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction. Although Whitehead's widely divergent books complicate overarching categorization, Derek C. Maus argues that they are linked by their skepticism toward the ostensible wisdom inherited from past generations and the various forms of "stories" that transmit it. Whitehead, best known for his Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Underground Railroad, bids readers to accompany him on challenging, often open-ended literary excursions designed to reexamine—and frequently defy—accepted notions of truth.

Understanding Colson Whitehead unravels the parallel structures found within Whitehead's books from his 1999 debut The Intuitionist through 2019's The Nickel Boys, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. By first imitating and then violating their conventions, Whitehead attempts to transcend the limits of the formulas of the genres in which he seems to write. Whitehead similarly tests subject matter, again imitating and then satirizing various forms of conventional wisdom as a means of calling out unexamined, ignored, or malevolent aspects of American culture.

Although it is only one of many subjects that Whitehead addresses, race is often central to his work. It serves as a prime example of Whitehead's attempt to prompt his readers into revisiting their assumptions about meanings and values. By upending the literary formulas of the detective novel, the heroic folktale, the coming-of-age story, the zombie apocalypse, the slave narrative, and historical fiction, Whitehead reveals the flaws and shortcomings by which Americans have defined themselves. In addition to evoking such explicitly literary storytelling traditions, Whitehead also directs attention toward other interrelated historical and cultural processes that influence how race, class, gender, education, social status, and other categories of identity determine what an individual supposedly can and cannot do.
categories: Southern History, Architecture & Engineering, ebook, hardcover, New & Noteworthy, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:Tabby Architecture of Beaufort, South Carolina, and the Sea Islands
custom_byline1: Colin Brooker
custom_byline2: foreword by Lawrence S. Rowland
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custom_author_blurb:Colin Brooker has been principal of Brooker Architectural Design Consultants (BADC) in Beaufort County, South Carolina, since 1980. BADC is a small consortium of specialists engaged in historic resource management, heritage tourism, historic building conservation, and documentation. The firm excels in tabby building repair and conservation, having worked on numerous tabby structures in coastal South Carolina, Georgia, and the Caribbean.
custom_reviews:"Grounded on research remarkable for both its depth and breadth, architect Colin Brooker traces the complicated origins of tabby construction across three continents and many centuries. This much-needed book finally pulls together the complicated origins of the Lowcountry's distinctive early building method for anyone who is interested in the architectural history of South Carolina."—Carter L. Hudgins, Clemson University

"Brooker explores tabby from every conceivable angle, including its chemistry, antecedents, variants, history, and literature, and writes with winning ease. His research is impeccable, and his knowledge of the material profound."—The Northern Mariner

"Brooker takes the reader on an in-depth historical tour of the history of tabby from its roots in North Africa up to modern day research and restoration... Take this book as your opportunity to explore your local landmarks and as a rich field guide to the hidden treasures and rich heritage of South Carolina."—South Carolina Libraries

"Colin Brooker's The Shell Builders: Tabby Architecture of Beaufort, South Carolina, and the Sea Islands is a monumental assemblage of decades of experience and research regarding this material that focuses on examples from Beaufort, South Carolina, and the Sea Islands in this region... this volume will likely prove to be a foundational elucidation of the value of this material."—Journal of Southern History
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content: Beaufort, South Carolina, is well known for its historical architecture, but perhaps none is quite as remarkable as those edifices formed by tabby, sometimes called coastal concrete, comprising a mixture of lime, sand, water, and oyster shells. Tabby itself has a storied history stretching back to Iberian, Caribbean, Spanish American, and even African roots—brought to the United States by adventurers, merchants, military engineers, planters, and the enslaved.

Tabby has been preserved most abundantly in the Beaufort area and its outlying islands, (and along the Sea Islands all the way to Florida as well) with Fort Frederick in 1734 having the earliest example of a diverse group of structures, which included town houses, seawalls, planters' homes, barns, agricultural buildings, and slave quarters. Tabby's insulating properties are excellent protection from long, hot, humid, and sometimes deadly summers; and on the islands, particularly, wealthy plantation owners built grand houses for themselves and improved dwellings for enslaved workers that after two hundred-plus years still stand today.

An extraordinarily hardy material, tabby has a history akin to some of the world's oldest building techniques and is referred to as "rammed earth," as well as " tapia" in Spanish, "pisé de terre" in French, and "hangtu" in Chinese. The form that tabby construction took along the Sea Islands, however, was born of necessity. Here stone and brick were rare and expensive, but the oyster shells that were used as the source for the tabby's lime base were plentiful. Today these bits of shell, often visible in the walls and forms constructed long ago, give tabby its unique and iconic appearance.

Colin Brooker, architect and expert on historic restoration, has not only made an exhaustive foray into local tabby architecture and heritage; he also has made a multinational tour as well in search of tabby origins, evolution, and diffusion from the Bahamas to Morocco to Andalusia, which can be traced back as far as the tenth century. Brooker has spent more than thirty years investigating the origins of tabby, its chemistry, its engineering, and its limitations. The Shell Builders lays out a sweeping, in-depth, and fascinating investigative journey—at once archaeological, sociological, and historical—into the ways prior inhabitants used and shaped their environment in order to house and protect themselves, leaving behind an architectural legacy that is both mysterious and beautiful.

Lawrence S. Rowland, a distinguished professor emeritus of history at the University of South Carolina Beaufort and past president of the South Carolina Historical Society, provides a foreword.
categories: Civil Rights, Memoir & Biography, ebook, hardcover, Forthcoming, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:An Intimate History of School Desegregation in South Carolina
custom_byline1: June Manning Thomas
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custom_author_blurb:June Manning Thomas is the Mary Frances Berry Distinguished University Professor Emerita of Urban Planning at the University of Michigan.
custom_reviews:"This book tells a fascinating, powerful story about race, education, and civil rights in South Carolina that illuminates contemporary American predicaments. Combining memoir and history, June Manning Thomas shows how segregation has affected Black people educationally, socially, and emotionally. This examination of the past casts useful light on the moral and political conditions for moving our society toward a more democratic future."—Howell Baum, author of Brown and Baltimore: School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

"By telling her story in the larger context of Southern Racism, vitriolic resistance for anything challenging the status quo, and the structural assault on human and familial dignity and integrity, Dr. Thomas sets up the heroic story of the battle against these forces, and the deep wounds and traumas that still call out to be healed."—Hoda Mahmoudi, The Bahá'í Chair for World Peace, University of Maryland
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content: In 1964 June Manning Thomas became one of the first thirteen Black students to desegregate Orangeburg High School in South Carolina. This extraordinary experience shaped her life and spurred in her a passion to understand racism and its effect on education in the Black community. In Struggling to Learn, Thomas details the personal trauma she and her Black classmates experienced during desegregation, the great difficulties Black communities have faced gaining access to K-12 and higher education, and the social and political tools Black southerners used to combat segregation and claim belonging.

Combining meticulous research and poignant personal narrative, this provocative true story reveals the long and painful struggle for equal education in the Jim Crow South. Thomas articulates why Black communities persisted in their pursuit of school desegregation despite the hostility and unfulfilled promises along the way. This is a story of constructive resilience—the fighting spirit of an oppressed people to ensure a better life for themselves and their children.
categories: Southern History, Music & Theater, paperback, ebook, hardcover, New & Noteworthy, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Music, Community, and Tragedy in a Southern Blues Bar
custom_byline1: Daniel M. Harrison
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custom_author_blurb:Daniel M. Harrison is a professor of sociology at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina, and the author of Making Sense of Marshall Ledbetter: The Dark Side of Political Protest.
custom_reviews:"An account of an extraordinary Southern musical oasis and the tragedy that shut it down... Fans of the blues and lively music clubs will find this fascinating."—Kirkus Reviews

"Jackson Station was no ordinary juke joint. The old train depot on a rural South Carolina highway was home to late-night magic, occasional mayhem, and hot live music. In his highly compelling and well-researched account of the roadhouse, author Daniel Harrison reveals its colorful history in a story of family, the blues, diversity, and ultimately, tragedy. It's a distinctively Southern tale of a uniquely Southern place."—Michael Miller, former music writer, The State (Columbia, S.C.)

"I imagine that, if I hadn't frequented Jackson Station, I'd have not become a writer, for better or worse. Way to go, Dan Harrison, for directing a light on this place that changed people's lives in a nowhere spot of South Carolina."—George Singleton, author of You Want More: Selected Stories

"Like a great bluesman, sociologist Daniel Harrison knows how to tell a story. In Live at Jackson Station, Harrison tells the story behind one of South Carolina's notorious juke joints: Jackson Station. Harrison shows how this former railroad depot turned roadside tavern continued to serve as a liminal space from 1970 until its closure in 1990. Through in-person interviews with former musicians and Greenwood locals, Harrison shows how emotions felt at Jackson Station helped transition the physical structure beyond the chasm of time."—Vernon Burton, Judge Matthew J. Perry Distinguished Chair of History, Clemson University

"Jackson Station in the 1980s was a remarkable social laboratory in the midst of a slowly changing but still redneck-dominated part of rural South Carolina. Daniel Harrison's thoroughly researched history of this blues-themed musical night spot and its sudden and tragic demise documents a chapter in the gradual social change that has been taking place in this part of the country."—David Evans, Professor of Music Emeritus, The University of Memphis
custom_awards:Listen to Dan Harrison on SC Public Radio's Walter Edgar's Journal
Listen to Dan Harrison on the New Books Network Politics & Sociology podcast
Listen to Dan Harrison on South Carolina State Library's Library Voices SC podcast
content: The smoke was thick, the music was loud, and the beer was flowing. In the fast-and-loose 1980s, Jackson Station Rhythm & Blues Club in Hodges, South Carolina, was a festive late-night roadhouse filled with people from all walks of life who gathered to listen to the live music of high-energy performers. Housed in a Reconstruction-era railway station, the blues club embraced local Southern culture and brought a cosmopolitan vibe to the South Carolina backcountry.

Over the years, Jackson Station became known as one of the most iconic blues bars in the South. It offered an exciting venue for local and traveling musical artists, including Widespread Panic, the Swimming Pool Qs, Bob Margolin, Tinsley Ellis, and R&B legend Nappy Brown, who loved to keep playing long after sunrise.

The good times ground to a terrifying halt in the early morning hours of April 7, 1990. A brutal attack—an apparent hate crime—on the owner Gerald Jackson forever altered the lives of all involved.

In this fast-paced narrative, Jackson Station emerges as a cultural kaleidoscope that served as an oasis of tolerance and diversity in a time and place that often suffered from undercurrents of bigotry and violence—an uneasy coexistence of incongruent forces that have long permeated southern life and culture.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, U.S. History, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:The Federal Courts and the Long Struggle for Civil Rights in South Carolina
custom_byline1: Stephen H. Lowe
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custom_author_blurb:Stephen H. Lowe is a professor of history at the University of South Carolina Union and director of the liberal studies and organizational leadership programs for the University of South Carolina's Palmetto College.
custom_reviews:"Stephen Lowe shows how citizen activists and their lawyers used direct action and litigation to undermine South Carolina's version of segregation through a careful and detailed examination of what actually happened in the federal courts."—Mark Tushnet, William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law emeritus, Harvard Law School

"This is a book of great import, combining first-rate narrative and incisive analysis. Lowe provides the essential details that create the larger discourse of the national fight against Jim Crow. There is elegance and power in this critical story."—Orville Vernon Burton, author of Justice Deferred: Race and the Supreme Court

"Lowe's work makes a powerful case that South Carolina has and continues to be the front line of Black struggles for equality and justice and an exemplar of White supremacy's dogged hold on American life and institutions."—Peter F. Lau, author of Democracy Rising: South Carolina and the Fight for Black Equality since 1865

"In this engaging and deeply researched book, Stephen Lowe explains that in the Palmetto State the federal courts served as the primary field of conflict where Blacks and Whites battled over competing visions of justice and law. Lowe's analysis of how "Freedom of Choice" was dismantled during the mid-to-late 1960s further distinguishes this work."—Andrew H. Myers, University of South Carolina Upstate
custom_awards:Listen to Steven Lowe on SC Public Radio's South Carolina Lede podcast
Listen to Steven Lowe on SC Public Radio's Walter Edgar's Journal
content: As the first comprehensive study of one state's federal district courts during the long civil rights movement, The Slow Undoing argues for a reconsideration of the role of the federal courts in the civil rights movement. It places the courts as a central battleground at the intersections of struggles over race, law, and civil rights. During the long civil rights movement, Black and White South Carolinians used the courts as a venue to contest the meanings of the constitution, justice, equality, and citizenship.

African American plaintiffs and lawyers from South Carolina, with the support of Thurgood Marshall and other lawyers from the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, brought and argued civil rights lawsuits in South Carolina's federal courts attempting to secure the vote, raise teacher salaries, and to equalize and then desegregate schools, parks, and public life. In response, white citizens, state politicians, and local officials, hired their own lawyers who countered these arguments by crafting new legal theories in an attempt to defend state practices and thwart African American aspirations of equality and to preserve white supremacy.

The Slow Undoing argues for a reconsideration of the role of federal courts in the civil rights movement by demonstrating that both before and after Brown v. Board of Education, the federal district courts were centrally important to achieving and solidifying civil rights gains. It relies on the entire legal record of actions in the federal district courts of South Carolina from 1940 to 1970 to make the case. It argues that rather than relying on litigation during the pre-Brown era and direct action in the post-Brown era, African Americans instead used courts and direct action in tandem to bring down legal segregation throughout the long civil rights era. But the process was far from linear and the courts were not always a progressive force. The battles were long, the victories won were often imperfect, and many of the fights remain. Author Stephen H. Lowe offers a chronicle of this enduring struggle.
categories: Cultural Studies & Sociology, East-West Encounters in Literature and Cultural Studies, World Literature, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Philosophy, Literature, and Culture
custom_byline1: edited by Paul Allen Miller
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custom_author_blurb:Paul Allen Miller is vice provost and Carolina Distinguished Professor at the University of South Carolina. He received his Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Texas. Miller is the author of Lyric Texts and Lyric Consciousness, Latin Erotic Elegy, Subjecting Verses, Latin Verse Satire, Postmodern Spiritual Practices, Plato's Apology of Socrates with Charles Platter, A Tibullus Reader, Diotima at the Barricades: French Feminists Read Plato, and Horace and is the editor of fourteen volumes of essays on literary theory and gender studies.
custom_reviews:"Digitalizing the Global Text is a vibrant volume that explores the paradoxes of the local, the global, and the universal, with particular emphasis on the digital humanities. This wonderful collection of essays from an accomplished global group of contributors will be of wide interest to humanities scholars across the world."—Jeffrey R. Di Leo, University of Houston, Victoria

"Digitalizing the Global Text stages a crucial intervention into discussions and debates around globalization and digitalization. The essays in the volume reflect on globalization not from the vantage of its giddy heyday but from the culture it has left in its wake in our own era of renewed walls, nationalisms, and biological racisms. How can we begin to imagine anew a globalization and a digital sphere that does not merely translate into capitalist profiteering? This is the crucial question at once asked and answered by this collection."—Christopher Breu, author of Insistence of the Material

"Traversing historical periods and national boundaries, with topics ranging from Plato to 'Gangnam Style' and beyond, the essays in Digitalizing the Global Text represent a vast array of perspectives while resisting the tendency to fetishize or hype the global. This collection represents a major contribution to the study of world literatures and cultures today."—Robert T. Tally Jr., Texas State University

"Digitalizing the Global Text is a splendid contribution to the on-going work of challenging globalism. Refusing to settle for its dominant neoliberal form, marked by the digitization of knowledge and homogenization of cultural production, this volume pursues alternative forms of life—recalcitrant ones—that do not sacrifice the singularities of the local in their illustration and enactment of the global."—Zahi Zalloua, Editor, The Comparatist

"This is a timely and forthright collection on what happens to the cultural within forms of globalization and globality. There are vital contributions on the global digital that throw light on how the conditions of cultural circulation and appreciation have changed in the contemporary period. Essays address not just the impact of popular culture (K-pop, for instance) but also attempt to understand how thinking itself is recalibrated between the shifting scales of local and global. A template for global cultural critique."—Peter Hitchcock, Baruch College, CUNY
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content: A few years ago globalism seemed to be both a known and inexorable phenomenon. With the end of the Cold War, the opening of the Chinese economy, and the ascendancy of digital technology, the prospect of a unified flow of goods and services and of people and ideas seemed unstoppable. Political theorists such as Francis Fukuyama proclaimed that we had reached "the end of history." Yes, there were pockets of resistance and reaction, but these, we were told, would be swept away in a relentless tide of free markets and global integration that would bring Hollywood, digital finance, and fast food to all. Religious fundamentalism, nationalism, and traditional sexual identities would melt away before the forces of "modernity" and empire. A relentless, technocratic rationality would sweep all in its wake, bringing a neoliberal utopia of free markets, free speech, and increasing productivity.

Nonetheless, as we have begun to experience the backlash against a global world founded on digital fungibility, the perils of appeals to nationalism, identity, and authenticity have become only too apparent. The collapse of Soviet Communism left an ideological vacuum that offered no recognized place from which to oppose global capitalism. What is the alternative? The anxieties and resentments produced by this new world order among those left behind are often manifested in assertions of xenophobia and particularity. This is what it supposedly means to be really American, truly Muslim, properly Chinese. The "other" is coming to take what is ours, and we must "defend" ourselves.

Digitalizing the Global Text is a collection of essays by an international group of scholars situated squarely at this nexus of forces. Together these writers examine how literature, culture, and philosophy in the global and digital age both enable the creation of these simultaneously utopian and dystopian worlds and offer a resistance to them.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: Alexander Moran
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custom_author_blurb:Alexander Moran, Faculty Chair for Excellence in Undergraduate and Graduate Writing at Stanbridge University, is the editor of Conversations with Jennifer Egan.
custom_reviews:"Jennifer Egan is among the most significant American writers at work today. In this first single-author study of her work, Alexander Moran animatedly illuminates staged authenticity across Egan's oeuvre. This book is a crucial touchstone for a critical field that has only just begun to give Egan her due."—Martin Paul Eve, Birkbeck College, University of London

"Alexander Moran offers perceptive thorough incisive readings of Egan's major works in this full-length study—one long overdue given her importance as a major voice in contemporary fiction. Extending far past A Visit from the Goon Squad to consider Egan's oeuvre, Moran illuminates the imaginative breadth of one of our most challenging writers, working at and beyond the conflicted boundary of the post-postmodern."—Jeffrey Roessner, Mercyhurst University

"Combining astute analysis with choice biographical insights, Understanding Jennifer Egan offers an impressive account of one of America's premier contemporary novelists. Moran's book shines a particularly welcome light on Egan's neglected early fiction and journalism, and deftly sets her career in the context of major debates in literary studies today."—Adam Kelly, University of York

"Cogent, thought-provoking, and packed with insight, Moran's book moves Egan to the forefront of the discussion about living American writers. Scholars, fans, and critics will rejoice: Egan's work finally has the full analysis it deserves."—Matt Bucher, International David Foster Wallace Society
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content: Understanding Jennifer Egan is the first book-length study of the novelist, short-story writer, and journalist best known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad. Alexander Moran examines each of Egan's varied published works, analyzes how her journalism informs her fiction, excavates her literary and intellectual influences, and considers her place in contemporary fiction.

Moran argues that because Egan's fiction is not easily categorized many of her novels have been underappreciated. He proposes a framework for understanding her writing centered on what it means to have, and to write, an "authentic" experience. In Emerald City, Egan explores the authenticity of touristic experience; in The Invisible Circus, her focus shifts to the authenticity of historical memory; in Look at Me, The Keep, and A Visit from the Goon Squad, she explores the effects of digital technology on how we understand authentic experience. In the concluding chapter, Moran discusses Egan's 2017 novel Manhattan Beach as a text that explores the authenticity of history and genre while resonating with the instability of the present.
categories: Civil Rights, Architecture & Engineering, paperback, ebook, Books, South Carolina History & Culture,
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custom_subtitle:A Guidebook
custom_byline1: Lydia Mattice Brandt
custom_byline2: photographs by Chandler Yonkers
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custom_author_blurb:Lydia Mattice Brandt is an architectural historian, historic preservationist, associate professor of art history at the University of South Carolina, and host of the podcast Historically Complex. She is the author of First in the Homes of His Countrymen: George Washington's Mount Vernon in the American Imagination and many articles published in Winterthur Portfolio, Antiques & Fine Art, and the Public Historian.
custom_reviews:"The South Carolina State House Grounds sets a new standard for guidebooks. Brandt offers insightful histories of individual monuments and charts changes in the capitol's landscape to illuminate the state's political and social history. Brandt brings alive the State House Grounds in a way that will reward even those readers who have never visited them."—Dell Upton, author of American Architecture: A Thematic History

"This is the definitive book about the State House grounds. Thoroughly researched and readable entries focusing upon each monument make the park-like setting meaningful."—John M. Bryan, author of Creating the South Carolina Statehouse

"Brandt provides a fresh understanding of South Carolina's prime public space. This well-written and well-illustrated study will be valuable not only to the state's citizens and visitors but also for people thinking about public spaces far and wide."—Catherine W. Bishir, author of North Carolina Architecture
custom_awards:Listen to Lydia Mattice Brandt on South Carolina State Library's Library Voices SC podcast
Watch to Lydia Mattice Brandt on SCETV's This Week in South Carolina
content: The South Carolina State House grounds are a work in progress—a cultural landscape of human-built and natural components connected physically, conceptually, and aesthetically. As public property, the grounds should represent and welcome everyone in the state. While it is a beautiful space, it is not neutral. Over the past two centuries, various groups have jostled for political and cultural power, and the winners have used the grounds to assert their authority and broadcast political positions on the state's most visible stage. These struggles have resulted in a perpetually evolving space.

In The South Carolina State House Grounds, the first comprehensive narrative of this important site at the heart of the Palmetto State, Lydia Mattice Brandt details the history of the state capitol and its setting—including the national, state, and local histories enshrined in its monuments—from 1787 to the present. Brandt argues that generations of private citizens and elected officials, who recognized the power of erecting public monuments and buildings that recall certain versions of history, have consciously shaped this highly charged, visible, and public place to assert authority over both the past and present. By recounting the intentions behind each element in the landscape, this guidebook considers how South Carolinians have used this place as a site of storytelling and mythmaking.

The South Carolina State House Grounds, a chronological history of the state's grandest public space, includes more than sixty illustrations that track the site's transformation over more than two centuries. Brandt chronicles the events that occurred in and around its buildings, the stories of the people memorialized in the grounds' monuments, and the histories of the monuments themselves.
categories: Civil Rights, Memoir & Biography, paperback, New & Noteworthy, Books,
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custom_subtitle:White Privilege, Race, and a Lawyer's Life in Civil Rights
custom_byline1: Lewis M. Steel
custom_byline2: with Beau Friedlander
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custom_author_blurb:Lewis M. Steel, an associate counsel with the NAACP in the 1960s, is senior counsel at Outten & Golden LLP, focusing on civil rights and antidiscrimination. His articles have appeared in the New York Times, the Nation, and other publications.

Beau Friedlander's writing has appeared in many publications including the New York Times, Time Magazine, Harper's Magazine, and the Paris Review. He lives in Brooklyn.
custom_reviews:". . . timely, essential, and deeply inspiring."—Henry Lewis Gates, Jr., Harvard University

"Steel writes movingly . . . Drawing on his experiences in two different social and cultural worlds, Steel has no trouble getting to the dark heart of our nation's racial ills in this polished, accomplished book."—Publisher's Weekly (starred review)

"An articulate, emotionally moving chronicle of a life informed by racial unrest and elevated with dutiful humanitarianism."—Kirkus Reviews

"A fascinating insider's look into the legal side of the civil-rights battle."—Booklist
custom_awards:
content: Lewis M. Steel, born a Warner Brothers' grandson, inherited a life of privilege, access, and opportunity. With every option available, he chose a life of purpose, spending more than fifty years as a no-holds-barred civil rights lawyer whose victories set legal precedents still relevant today. In The Butler's Child, Steel explores the important role race played in his upbringing, anchored by his relationship with the family's African American butler, and why this attorney has devoted his life to pursuing racial justice.

This insightful life story chronicles his close relationship with Robert L. Carter, his mentor and extraordinary NAACP general counsel. Steel was there during the Attica uprising, represented innocent African Americans in front-page murder cases, and played a central role in the evolution of civil rights law from the height of the movement to landmark cases in the decades that followed. The Butler's Child provides an insider's look at some of these emotion-packed, hard-fought trials and decisions from the 1960s to the present by an attorney still working to advance rights that should be available to all.
categories: Business & Economics, Music & Theater, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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Pages: 184
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custom_title:
custom_subtitle:The Business of the Professional Theater
custom_byline1: Tim Donahue and Jim Patterson
custom_byline2: foreword by Ken Davenport
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custom_price: $
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custom_author_blurb:Tim Donahue holds an M.B.A. from the University of South Carolina, where he retired from the Department of Theatre and Dance as the director of marketing and development. He is the author of Playing for Prizes: America's Award for Best Drama and Best Musical and co-author of Theater Careers: A Realistic Guide, A Concise History of Theatre, and The Enjoyment of Theatre.

Jim Patterson (1935-2020) was Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Theatre at the University of South Carolina and the author of Stage Directing and Theatre in the Classroom: Grades 6–12 and co-author of The Enjoyment of Theatre and A Concise History of Theatre. A member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, Patterson had earned numerous awards for his work as a director and educator.
custom_reviews:"Stage Money offers a concise yet deftly drawn introduction to producing professional theater in America. The authors skillfully portray the critical relationship between the commercial and not-for-profit sectors and offer accessible explanations of the often-convoluted financial and artistic machinations that result in a theatrical production."—Steven Adler, author of On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way

"The authors of Stage Money illuminate current business models with breathtaking thoroughness and ground their observations in anecdotal evidence as well as facts and figures of budgeting, tax codes, union contracts, ticket pricing, and marketing and publicity concerns."—James Fisher, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
custom_awards:
content: For decades roughly 80 percent of commercial Broadway productions have failed to recoup their original investments. In light of this shocking and harsh reality, how does the show go on? Tim Donahue and Jim Patterson answer this question and many others in this updated edition of their popular, straightforward guide to understanding professional theater finances and the economic realities of theater production.

This revised edition of Stage Money not only includes the latest financial information and illuminating examples of key concepts; it has been enhanced with a discussion of the stagehands' union plus a new chapter on marketing for the theater. These new elements combined with the essentials of the first edition create an expansive overview of the contemporary theater business. Stage Money is designed for theater enthusiasts and professionals interested in understanding the inner workings of this industry today and its challenges for the future.

Ken Davenport, two-time Tony Award winner, Broadway and Off Broadway theater producer, blogger, writer, and owner of Davenport Theatrical Enterprises writer, offers a foreword.

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