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Join a virtual conversation between Claudia Smith Brinson, author of Stories of Struggle: The Clash over Civil Rights in South Carolina and Friendship Nine organizer Tom Gaither, moderated by Professor Adolphus Belk, Jr.

In Stories of Struggle, Brinson distills decades of research, including more than 150 interviews with the men and women who spearheaded the civil rights struggle in South Carolina. Her book focuses on the incredible courage of African American activists who dared take on the majority Jim Crow culture of the 1960s. These heart-breaking, inspiring stories contradict the myth that South Carolina reacted to the civil rights movement more humanely than other Southern states.

Rock Hill and York County are featured prominently in Stories of Struggle. Brinson describes how students from Friendship College conducted the first lunch counter sit-ins in South Carolina, and devotes an entire chapter to the Rev. Cecil A. Ivory, who mentored Friendship College freedom fighters and organized the boycott that brought down the Rock Hill bus line because of its racist policies.

Conversation Participants

Claudia Smith Brinson, a South Carolina journalist for more than three decades, has won more than 30 awards, including Knight Ridder’s Award of Excellence and an O. Henry Award for short fiction. She was a member of the Pulitzer finalist team covering Hurricane Hugo. Visit StoriesofStruggle.com.

Thomas W. Gaither, Ph.D., was the only member of the “Friendship Nine” who was not a student at Friendship College when they were arrested on Jan. 31, 1961, He served as as field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and later was a scout for the Freedom Riders. He spent his entire teaching career at Slippery Rock University, where he was recognized for creating diversity at the university and awarded an honorary doctorate.

Adolphus Belk Jr., Ph.D., has been a professor in political science at Winthrop University since 2003. He has taught courses on government and race and ethnic politics. He is the former director of the African American Studies Program at Winthrop and in 2019 was elected as faculty representative to the university’s Board of Trustees.

Registration is required for this FREE virtual event.


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The exhibition opened at the National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus, Ohio in September 2020. The 50-portrait watercolor series—one Veteran portrait from each state—was created to honor our country’s Veterans through art.

“We are excited to share this incredible Veteran art to connect, inspire and educate families -- wherever they may be – during the holidays and beyond,” said retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Ferriter, president and CEO of the National Veterans Memorial and Museum.

What began as an effort to paint the face of America turned into an all-consuming mission to uphold and honor the hidden heroes of our country. Journey across all 50 state with artist Mary Whyte and learn the story behind this seven year project - in her own words.

Tickets are available through March 21, 2021, at the museum’s website for $7. Museum members can enjoy the tour as a member benefit. Each ticket is available to the viewer(s) for 72 hours after purchase and can be viewed multiple times during the three-day period.

Book available at uscpress.com/We-the-People.


categories: South Carolina, Memoir & Biography, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:A Memoir of the South Carolina Coast
custom_byline1: Genevieve C. Peterkin
custom_byline2: foreword by Lee G. Brockington
afterword by William P. Baldwin
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content: Born in 1928 in the small coastal town of Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, Genevieve "Sister" Peterkin grew up with World War II bombing practice in her front yard, deep-sea fishing expeditions, and youthful rambles through the lowcountry. She shared her bedroom with a famous ghost and an impatient older sister. But most of all she listened. She absorbed the tales of her talented mother and her beloved friend, listened to the stories of the region's older residents, some of them former slaves, who were her friends, neighbors, and teachers. In this new edition she once again shares with readers her insider's knowledge of the lowcountry plantations, gardens, and beaches that today draw so many visitors. Beneath the humor, hauntings, and treasures of local history, she tells another, deeper story—one that deals with the struggle for racial equality in the South, with the sometimes painful adventures of marriage and parenthood, and with inner struggles for faith and acceptance. This edition includes a new foreword by coastal writer and researcher Lee G. Brockington and a new afterword by coauthor and lowcountry novelist William P. Baldwin.
categories: Southern History, paperback, Books,
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custom_subtitle:The Wpa Guide to Its Towns and Countryside
custom_byline1: Phinizy Spalding, Federal Writers' Project
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 426
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custom_subtitle:Supplement, 1834-1870
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
custom_byline2: with contributions by Alexander Moore
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 604
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custom_subtitle:1867-1870
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 678
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custom_subtitle:1858-1866
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 598
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custom_subtitle:1850-1857
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 648
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custom_subtitle:1845-1849
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant and T. C. Duncan Eaves
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categories: Literary Studies, Projects of the Simms Initiatives, paperback, Books,
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Pages: 616
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custom_subtitle:1830-1844
custom_byline1: edited by Mary C. Simms Oliphant, Alfred Taylor Odell, and T. C. Duncan Eaves
custom_byline2: introduction by Donald Davidson
with contributions by Alexander S. Salley
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categories: Cultural Studies & Sociology, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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Pages: 328
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader
custom_byline1: edited by Rebecca Fox and Robert L. Paquette
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custom_author_blurb:Rebecca Fox, chief of staff to the president at the University of Miami, holds a Ph.D. in history from Bryn Mawr College. Formerly senior associate vice president for university advancement at the University of Rochester and headmistress at Baltimore's Bryn Mawr School, Fox is Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's sister.

Robert L. Paquette is cofounder of the Alexander Hamilton Institute for the Study of Western Civilization in Clinton, New York, the author of Sugar Is Made with Blood (winner of the Elsa Goveia Prize for the best book in Caribbean history), and coeditor of The Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas.
custom_reviews:"Honoring a deceased colleague can be a labor of love as well as scholarship. Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader accomplishes this balance admirably through sixteen selected writings of Fox-Genovese and ten remembrances of her from an accomplished group of scholars. One result of this worthy project is to position Fox-Genovese for comparison with other scholars and commentators on women—from Southern historians Drew Faust and Florence King to theoretical historian Griselda Pollock to international analysts Juker Tati Imam Muhni, Miriam Cook, Ernestine Friedl, Louly Konz, Catherine Bateson, Claire Raymond, and Johnetta Cole. Through important works like this one, Fox-Genovese's viewpoints continue to enrich the study of women and related topics in the South and beyond. We should be deeply grateful to general editor David Moltke-Hansen and to the editors of this remarkable volume."—Dr. James Peacock, Kenan Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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content: History and Women, Culture and Faith is a five-volume collection of eighty essays and journal articles spanning the extraordinary intellectual career of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese (1941-2007). A working scholar for more than three decades, Fox-Genovese made significant contributions to European and Southern American history and became one of the most provocative scholars and educators of her time as she evolved intellectually from a Marxist to a feminist to a pro-life Roman Catholic. Although she authored or coauthored many well-received books, her prolific output as an essayist is less well known. This multivolume collection celebrates the scope of her scholarship and invites a fresh assessment of her legacy and influence.

Concluding this multivolume series of Fox-Genovese's fugitive works, Unbought Grace: An Elizabeth Fox-Genovese Reader draws on earlier volumes in the series to provide an overview of fundamental intellectual concerns that shaped her writings. Divided into two parts—sixteen essays written by Fox-Genovese and ten remembrances of her life—the contents of this volume demonstrate her remarkable range of subjects, methods, and audiences as she examined both historical and contemporary issues.

The volume at the same time reflects persistent issues and themes running through Fox-Genovese's work, and her life journey from Marxism and feminism to Roman Catholicism. As her perspectives evolved, Fox-Genovese reexamined and refined previous arguments about many of these issues and themes: power imbalances for marginalized populations, the rise of bourgeois hegemony, Lockean individualism and liberalism, feminism, religion, and a moral economy.

Remembrances of Fox-Genovese, written by colleagues and former students, conclude the book. Providing insight into her personal and professional relationships, these remarkable accounts allow the reader to understand better the woman behind the nuanced and thought-provoking essays.

Demonstrated through her own words and in the remembrances, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's life reflected more continuity than change. Her legacy is a remarkable wealth of academic knowledge, vigorous and complex moral arguments, and, most of all, a life lived searchingly through her embrace of a deep, abiding faith that defined her scholarship and personal life.
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Explorations and Commitments: Religion, Faith, Culture
custom_byline1: edited by Ann Hartle and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose
custom_byline2: foreword by Mark A. Noll
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custom_author_blurb:Ann Hartle, professor of philosophy at Emory University, has published books and articles on topics in the history of philosophy and on the nature of philosophy and of human being.

Shelia O'Connor-Ambrose earned a Ph.D. in women's studies from Emory University, where she studied with Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. Editor of Fox-Genovese's posthumously published Marriage: The Dream That Refuses to Die, Connor-Ambrose is a fellow of the Alexander Hamilton Institute in Clinton, New York.
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content: Following Fox-Genovese's lifelong discourse concerning the individual and the community, Volume 4, Explorations and Commitments: Religion, Faith, and Culture, contains twenty-five essays that document her migration from a secular historian's understanding of religion to a view of faiths informed by her conversion to Roman Catholicism. Throughout her journey, Fox-Genovese firmly asserted that the church offered past and present protection to culture against the excesses of modernity by advocating the sanctity of life, preserving the importance of the family, and respecting genuine community.

Mirroring Fox-Genovese's recognition of the importance of religion to the development of history and the underpinnings of a common culture, this volume begins with a series of essays examining the value of studying religion through a historical lens. Even prior to her conversion, Fox-Genovese's personal blending of Marxism and feminism led her to become an advocate for the sanctity of human life, believing that abortion was the abhorrent nadir of a society that valued economic gain, individual freedom from responsibility, and untrammeled personal liberty over natural human relationships. When Fox-Genovese converted to Catholicism in 1995, she refined many of the previous themes that had characterized her lifelong work to reflect the fulfillment of a Christian sense of community, faith, feminine and familial identity, and culture. The essays in this volume provide an intimate perspective to Fox-Genovese's faith transformation as she investigated a variety of literary, philosophical, economic, and sociopolitical issues.

Volume 4 also includes a foreword by Mark A. Noll, the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame and author of America's God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln and The Civil War as a Theological Crisis.
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Intersections: History, Culture, Ideology
custom_byline1: edited by David Moltke-Hansen
custom_byline2: foreword by Thomas L. Pangle
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custom_author_blurb:David Moltke-Hansen is coeditor of Cambridge Studies on the American South and director of the digital William Gilmore Simms editions at the University of South Carolina. For more than thirty years, he has built and managed historical collections and programs at the South Carolina Historical Society, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Historical Society of Pennsylvania.
custom_reviews:"Both the analytical brilliance and the extraordinary erudition and range of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese are amply demonstrated in this remarkable collection. Underpinning all of the essays, however diverse, is the author's moral clarity and search for the common good. Intersections offers a wonderful entrée to the work of one of the great intellectuals of our time. Thomas L. Pangle's provocative foreword and David Moltke-Hansen's excellent introduction on Fox-Genovese as essayist further enhance the collection's appeal."—Peter A. Coclanis, Albert R. Newsome Distinguished Professor of History, UNC-Chapel Hill
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content: History and Women, Culture and Faith is a five-volume collection of eighty essays and journal articles spanning the extraordinary intellectual career of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese (1941-2007). A working scholar for more than three decades, Fox-Genovese made significant contributions to European and southern American history and became one of the most provocative scholars and educators of her time as she evolved from a Marxist to a feminist to a prolife Roman Catholic. Although she authored or coauthored ten well-received books, her prolific output as an essayist is less well known. This multivolume collection celebrates the scope of her scholarship and invites a fresh assessment of her legacy and influence.

Offering entry into Fox-Genovese's most enduring concerns throughout her lifetime, Volume 3, Intersections: History, Culture, Ideology, challenges readers to examine with the author the emergence of bourgeois hegemony and relationships of gender, class, and power through a series of eighteen reflective essays. Written over the course of three decades, and including Fox-Genovese's first published essay, this volume integrates often conflicting models of thought—Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism—to dissect power relationships and other social mechanisms that create human culture.

Incorporating examples from eighteenth-century French and Southern American history, Fox-Genovese dissects the emergence of and threats to a common culture, guided by the growth of bourgeois social forces, capitalism, and feminism. The essays begin with a critique of French Physiocratic economics and its application to European power structures. Additional essays survey a range of topics from literary analysis of Southern intellectuals such as Augusta Jane Evans Wilson and Henry Timrod to threats of multiculturalism to the teaching of an expanded and revised Western civilization "canon." Seeking to identify cultural standards and familial relationships in an early modern society, Fox-Genovese examines the commodification of the individual woman with "The Empress's New Clothes: The Politics of Fashion." The commodification of "motherhood" and "sisterhood" is further explored within additional essays.

Fox-Genovese's focus on large social questions and the theoretical underpinnings and consequences of different approaches to those questions, combined with her range of subjects, provides readers with distinctive and enduring scholarship.

Volume 3 also includes a foreword by Thomas L. Pangle, the Joe R. Long Chair in Democratic Studies in the Department of Government at the University of Texas and the codirector of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Study of Core Texts and Ideas.
categories: Southern History, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Selected Writings of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese: Ghosts and Memories: White and Black Southern Women's Lives and Writings
custom_byline1: edited by Kibibi Mack-Shelton and Christina Bieber Lake
custom_byline2: foreword by Mark Bauerlein
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custom_author_blurb:One of Fox-Genovese's former students, Kibibi Mack-Shelton was previously the Tyler and Alice Haynes Professor at the University of Richmond. She is the author of Parlor Ladies and Ebony Drudges: African American Women, Class, and Work in a South Carolina Community and Ahead of Her Time in Yesteryear: Geraldyne Pierce Zimmerman Comes of Age in a Southern African American Family.

Christina Bieber Lake, also one of Fox-Genovese's former students, is an associate professor of English at Wheaton College and the author of The Incarnational Art of Flannery O'Connor.
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content: Written between the 1970s and the early twenty-first century, the fifteen pioneering essays in Ghosts and Memories share in decoding and contextualizing the writings and history of white and black southern women. In these essays Elizabeth Fox-Genovese moves beyond literary criticism to give illuminating historical context to the ways that slavery, race, and gender shaped—and were shaped by—the lives and writingsof her subjects from the late-eighteenth century into the twentieth. As a result Fox-Genovese provides readers interpretations and perspectives that at once challenge and transform conventional stereotypes that frame our ideas about women's roles in Southern history and about texts reflecting on those roles.

Fox-Genovese's essays in this and other volumes provoke thought and insight with their combination of clarity and subtlety. Here she illuminates books out of the Harlem Renaissance by Zora Neale Hurston and out of Civil War-era Alabama by Augusta Jane Evans Wilson. And her keen assessments of autobiographies of white activist Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin and black poet and activist Maya Angelou still resonate as fresh and powerful readings. Even the fictional character Scarlett O'Hara looks strikingly different under Fox-Genovese's gaze. Scholars will find this volume a window on aspects of understudied subjects and also an opportunity to engage in the challenges of reading and interpreting powerful texts created from psychologically and historically fraught circumstances.

Volume 2 also includes a foreword by Mark Bauerlein, professor of English at Emory University and author of Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906.
categories: South Carolina, Southern History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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Pages: 192
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custom_byline1: edited by Valinda W. Littlefield
custom_byline2: foreword by Walter Edgar
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custom_author_blurb:Valinda W. Littlefield is an associate professor of history and the director of African American studies at the University of South Carolina. She is a coeditor of South Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times and a contributor to Becoming Southern Writers: Essays in honor of Charles Joyner and The Routledge History of the American South.
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content: Prior to the twenty-first century, most historical writing about women in South Carolina focused on elite White women, even though working-class women of diverse backgrounds were actively engaged in the social, economic, and political battles of the state. Although often unrecognized publicly, they influenced cultural and political landscapes both within and outside of the state's borders through their careers, writing, art, music, and activism. Despite significant cultural, social, and political barriers, these brave and determined women affected sweeping change that advanced the position of women as well as their communities.

The entries in 101 Women Who Shaped South Carolina, which include many from the landmark text The South Carolina Encyclopedia, offer a concise and approachable history of the state, while recognizing the sacrifice, persistence, and sheer grit of its heroines and history makers.

A foreword is provided by Walter Edgar, Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, Environmental & Historic Preservation, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Reckoning with Jim Crow Era Confederate Monuments
custom_byline1: Roger C. Hartley
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custom_author_blurb:Roger C. Hartley, a professor of law at the Catholic University of America, is an award-winning teacher of constitutional law and labor law. He is the author of three other books and dozens of articles in leading academic journals.
custom_reviews:"The fraught subject of Confederate monuments in prominent public spaces receives the most forthright, well-informed, and unemotional treatment in this book that I have encountered anywhere. Whether or not one agrees with Hartley's argument that these products of the Cult of the Lost Cause symbolizing slavery and White supremacy should be relocated to private land, museums, or Confederate cemeteries, the reader will understand the issue better than ever before."—James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era

"Monuments to White supremacy have a deleterious impact on American society. Informed by historical accounts, the imperatives of racial justice, and his own legal expertise, Roger Hartley surveys the problematic presence of Confederate monuments in American public spaces and convincingly makes the case for their removal and relocation."—Erika Doss, author of Memorial Mania: Public Feeling in America

"Constitutional law professor Roger Hartley's book is a clear and practical exploration of the Confederate monuments controversy. A law brief of sorts for the removal of the hundreds of Confederate statues that still stand, Monumental Harm compellingly argues that opponents should pay less attention to monument defenders' motives and instead focus on the very real harm that Confederate statues inflict on American society today. Hartley shows monument opponents how to make their case—and win."—Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, authors of Denmark Vesey's Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy

"More than a history of Confederate monuments, Roger C. Hartley's Monumental Harm steers readers through some of the toughest questions in the debate over whether these monuments should remain or be removed. Anyone hoping to better understand this divisive debate will profit from reading this book."—Kevin M. Levin, author of Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War's Most Persistent Myth

"The problem of Confederate monuments has been the starting point for a national and international reconsideration of the memorial landscape. Roger C. Hartley's lucid analysis provides a valuable guide to addressing the legacy of the Lost Cause and a framework for thinking about protests against other public monuments."—Thomas J. Brown, author of Civil War Monuments and the Militarization of America
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content: In recent years, the debate over the future of Confederate monuments has taken center stage and caused bitter clashes in communities throughout the American South. At the heart of the debate is the question of what these monuments represent. The arguments and counterarguments are formulated around sets of assumptions grounded in Southern history, politics, culture, and race relations. Comprehending and evaluating accurately the associated claims and counterclaims calls for a careful examination of facts and legal considerations relevant to each side's assertations. In Monumental Harm, Roger C. Hartley offers a road map to addressing and resolving this acrimonious debate.

Although history and popular memory play a vital role in the discussion, there have been distortions of both parts. Monumental Harm reviews the fact-based history of the initial raising of these monuments and distinguishes it from the popular memory held by many Confederate-monument supporters. Hartley also addresses concerns regarding the potential erasure of history and the harm these monuments have caused the African American community over the years, as well as the role they continue to play in politics and power.

The recent rise in White nationalism and the video-recorded murders of Black citizens at the hands of White police officers have led to nationwide demonstrations and increased scrutiny of Confederate monuments on public land. As injustice is laid bare and tempers flare, the need for a peaceful resolution becomes ever-more necessary. Monumental Harm offers a way to break the rhetorical deadlock, urging that we evaluate the issue through the lens of the U.S. Constitution while employing the overarching democratic principle that no right is absolute. Through constructive discourse and good-faith compromise, a more perfect union is within reach.
categories: South Carolina, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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Pages: 192
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custom_byline1: edited by Bernard E. Powers, Jr.
custom_byline2: foreword by Walter Edgar
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custom_author_blurb:Bernard E. Powers, Jr., professor emeritus of history at the College of Charleston, was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston. He is the author of Black Charlestonians: A Social History 1822–1885 and coauthor of We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel. Powers is a founding board member and interim chief executive officer of the International African American Museum in Charleston.
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content: The first people of African descent to live in what is now South Carolina, enslaved people living in the sixteenth century Spanish settlements of San Miguel de Gualdape and Santa Elena, arrived even before the first permanent English settlement was established in 1670. For more than 350 years South Carolina's African American population has had a significant influence on the state's cultural, economic, and political development.

101 African Americans Who Shaped South Carolina depicts the long presence and profound influence people of African descent have had on the Palmetto State. Each entry offers a brief description of an individual with ties to South Carolina who played a significant role in the history of the state, nation, and, in some cases, world. Drawing upon the landmark text The South Carolina Encyclopedia, edited by Walter Edgar, the combined entries offer a concise and approachable history of the state and the African Americans who have shaped it.

A foreword is provided by Walter Edgar, Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina.
categories: Literary Studies, Fiction & Folklore, paperback, ebook, Books,
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Pages: 240
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custom_subtitle:Grotesque Legends and Folk Tales of Old Charleston
custom_byline1: John H. Bennett, Jr.
custom_byline2: introduction by Julia Eichelberger
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custom_author_blurb:John Bennett (1865–1956) was a novelist, artist, essayist, and poet of international acclaim who played a fundamental role in the Charleston Renaissance. His other books include the beloved children's story Master Skylark: A Story of Shakespeare's Time and The Treasure of Peyre Gaillard.
custom_reviews:"A collection of folk story, myth, drolleries, macabre unreason . . . old tales of death, mystery, bizarre incredibilities, diabolic influence, demanding ghosts, buried treasure, enchantments, miracles, visitations, and the dead that are not dead."—Kirkus Reviews
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content: "You ask for a story. I will tell you one, fact for fact and true for true." So begins "Crook-Neck Dick," one of twenty-three stories in this beguiling collection of Charleston lore. John Bennett's interpretations of the legends shared with him by African-descended Charlestonians have entertained generations. Among them are tales of ghosts, conjuring, superhuman feats, and supernatural powers; accounts of ingenuity, humor, terror, mystery, and solidarity will enchant folklorists, students of Charleston history, and all those who love a good ghost story.

Julia Eichelberger, the Marybelle Higgins Howe Professor of Southern Literature and an executive board member of the Center for Study of Slavery at the College of Charleston in South Carolina, provides an introduction.
categories: South Carolina, Southern History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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Pages: 182
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custom_byline1: edited by Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, and C. James Taylor
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custom_author_blurb:Walter Edgar is the Neuffer Professor of Southern Studies Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of South Carolina: A History, editor of The South Carolina Encyclopedia, and host of the radio program Walter Edgar's Journal.

J. Brent Morris is professor of history, chair of the Department of Humanities, and director of the Institute for the Study of the Reconstruction Era at the University of South Carolina Beaufort. He is the recipient of the 2010 Malcolm C. Clark Award of the South Carolina Historical Society and the 2018 Order of the South award by the Southern Academy of Letters, Arts, and Sciences.

C. James Taylor is the former editor in chief of the Adams Family Papers at the Massachusetts Historical Society. He is also a former associate research professor of history at the University of South Carolina and was coeditor of The Papers of Henry Laurens. He was coeditor with George C. Rogers Jr. of the second edition of A South Carolina Chronology.
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content: This third edition of A South Carolina Chronology offers a year-by-year chronology of landmark dates and events in South Carolina's recorded history. Unique to this volume are nearly thirty additional years of notable events and important updates to material covered in earlier editions. Historians Walter Edgar, J. Brent Morris, and C. James Taylor expand previously chronicled periods using a more contemporary view of race, gender, and other social issues, adding measurably to South Carolina's history.

While the previous edition referenced precontact South Carolina in a brief introduction, this edition begins with the chapter "Peopling the Continent (17,200 BCE-1669)." It acknowledges the extent to which the lands where Europeans began arriving in the fifteenth century had long been inhabited by indigenous people who were members of complex societies and sociopolitical networks.

An easy-to-use inventory of the people, politics, laws, economics, wars, protests, storms, and cultural events that have had a major influence on South Carolina and its inhabitants, this latest edition reflects a more complete picture of the state's past. From the earliest-known migrants to the increasingly complex global society of the early twenty-first century, A South Carolina Chronology offers a solid foundation for understanding the Palmetto State's past.
categories: Literary Studies, Memoir & Biography, African American Studies, paperback, ebook, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison
custom_byline1: Geneva Cobb Moore
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custom_author_blurb:Geneva Cobb Moore is a professor of English, women's and gender studies, and race and ethnic studies at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She is a former Fulbright scholar at the University of Ghana in West Africa and has received grants and awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She has published articles on Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Jacobs, Charlotte Forten Grimké, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and other writers. An adviser to Gale's Literature of Autobiographical Narrative, Moore has been a reviewer for Auto/Biography Studies.
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content: The first African American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, Toni Morrison is one of the most celebrated women writers in the world. In Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison, Geneva Cobb Moore explores how Morrison uses parody and pastiche, semiotics and metaphors, and allegory to portray black life in the United States, teaching untaught history to liberate Americans.

In this short and accessible book, originally published as part of Moore's Maternal Metaphors of Power in African American Women's Literature, she covers each of Morrison's novels, from The Bluest Eye to Beloved to God Help the Child. With a new introduction and added coverage of Morrison's final book, The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations, Bodily Evidence is essential reading for scholars, students, and readers of Morrison's novels.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Thomas Fahy
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custom_author_blurb:Thomas Fahy is a professor of English and Director of English Graduate Studies at Long Island University Post. He has published numerous books including Dining with Madmen: Fat, Food, and the Environment in 1980s Horror; Understanding Truman Capote; Staging Modern American Life: Popular Culture in the Experimental Theatre of Millay, Cummings, and Dos Passos; and the edited collection Peering Behind the Curtain: Disability, Illness, and the Extraordinary Body in Contemporary Theatre.
custom_reviews:"Gain a deeper appreciation for the Pulitzer- and Tony-winning playwright of August: Osage County, Mary Page Marlow, The Minutes, and Linda Vista...Exploring Letts' emotional power and cultural commentary, Fahy presents one of the first books to offer an engaging analysis of the playwright."—Playbill

"More than an excellent and compelling analysis of the work of one of America's leading playwrights, a writer whose imagination takes him, and us, on journeys into the private and social tensions of America, Understanding Tracy Letts explores the wider literary and social context of works which have the power to disturb, amuse, unnerve, and even, perhaps, console"—Christopher Bigsby, author of Twenty-First Century American Playwrights and Arthur Miller 1962-2005

"Understanding Tracy Letts not only delves into crucial biographical details instrumental to Letts' development as a playwright but also engagingly places his works in dialogue with Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner, The X-Files, food theory, quilting, and masculine studies. Fahy's book is a long needed holistic look at one of America's most important playwrights."—William Boles, Rollins College
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content: Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in drama as well as Tony Awards for best play and best actor, Tracy Letts has emerged as one of the greatest playwrights of the twenty-first century. Understanding Tracy Letts, the first book dedicated to his writing, is an introduction to his plays and an invitation to engage more deeply with his work—both for its emotional power and cultural commentary.

Experiencing a Tracy Letts play often feels akin to reading a Cormac McCarthy novel, watching a Cohen Brothers film, and seeing an episode of Breaking Bad at the same time. His characters can be ruthlessly cruel and funny, selfish and generous, delusional and incisive, and deceptive and painfully honest. They keep secrets. They harbor biases and misconceptions. And in their quest to find love and understanding, they often end up being the greatest impediments to their own happiness. As a writer, Letts can move seamlessly from the milieu of a Texas trailer park to the pulsating nightlife of London's countercultural scene, the stifling quiet of small-town Ohio to the racial tensions of urban Chicago. He thrives in the one-act format, in plays like Mary Page Marlow and The Minutes, as well as the epic scope of August: Osage County and Linda Vista. With a musician's sense of timing, Letts shifts between humor and heartache, silence and sound, and the mundane and the poetic. And he fearlessly tackles issues such as gender bias, racism, homophobia, and disability rights. Contemporary American life thus becomes a way to comment on the country's troubled history from Native American genocide to the civil rights movement. The personal narratives of his characters become gateways to the political.

Understanding Tracy Letts celebrates the range of Letts's writing, in part, by applying different critical approaches to his works. Whether through the lens of disability studies, the conspiracy genre, food studies, the feminist politics of quilting, or masculinity studies, these readings help bring out the thematic richness and sociopolitical dimensions of Letts's work.
categories: Cultural Studies & Sociology, East-West Encounters in Literature and Cultural Studies, World Literature, ebook, hardcover, Books, Bennett Fu, Paul Allen Miller, Chi-she Li,
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custom_subtitle:Philosophy, Literature, and Culture
custom_byline1: edited by Paul Allen Miller
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custom_author_blurb:Paul Allen Miller is vice provost and Carolina Distinguished Professor at the University of South Carolina. He received his Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Texas. Miller is the author of Lyric Texts and Lyric Consciousness, Latin Erotic Elegy, Subjecting Verses, Latin Verse Satire, Postmodern Spiritual Practices, Plato's Apology of Socrates with Charles Platter, A Tibullus Reader, Diotima at the Barricades: French Feminists Read Plato, and Horace and is the editor of fourteen volumes of essays on literary theory and gender studies.
custom_reviews:"Digitalizing the Global Text is a vibrant volume that explores the paradoxes of the local, the global, and the universal, with particular emphasis on the digital humanities. This wonderful collection of essays from an accomplished global group of contributors will be of wide interest to humanities scholars across the world."—Jeffrey R. Di Leo, University of Houston, Victoria

"Digitalizing the Global Text stages a crucial intervention into discussions and debates around globalization and digitalization. The essays in the volume reflect on globalization not from the vantage of its giddy heyday but from the culture it has left in its wake in our own era of renewed walls, nationalisms, and biological racisms. How can we begin to imagine anew a globalization and a digital sphere that does not merely translate into capitalist profiteering? This is the crucial question at once asked and answered by this collection."—Christopher Breu, author of Insistence of the Material

"Traversing historical periods and national boundaries, with topics ranging from Plato to 'Gangnam Style' and beyond, the essays in Digitalizing the Global Text represent a vast array of perspectives while resisting the tendency to fetishize or hype the global. This collection represents a major contribution to the study of world literatures and cultures today."—Robert T. Tally Jr., Texas State University

"Digitalizing the Global Text is a splendid contribution to the on-going work of challenging globalism. Refusing to settle for its dominant neoliberal form, marked by the digitization of knowledge and homogenization of cultural production, this volume pursues alternative forms of life—recalcitrant ones—that do not sacrifice the singularities of the local in their illustration and enactment of the global."—Zahi Zalloua, Editor, The Comparatist

"This is a timely and forthright collection on what happens to the cultural within forms of globalization and globality. There are vital contributions on the global digital that throw light on how the conditions of cultural circulation and appreciation have changed in the contemporary period. Essays address not just the impact of popular culture (K-pop, for instance) but also attempt to understand how thinking itself is recalibrated between the shifting scales of local and global. A template for global cultural critique."—Peter Hitchcock, Baruch College, CUNY
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content: A few years ago globalism seemed to be both a known and inexorable phenomenon. With the end of the Cold War, the opening of the Chinese economy, and the ascendancy of digital technology, the prospect of a unified flow of goods and services and of people and ideas seemed unstoppable. Political theorists such as Francis Fukuyama proclaimed that we had reached "the end of history." Yes, there were pockets of resistance and reaction, but these, we were told, would be swept away in a relentless tide of free markets and global integration that would bring Hollywood, digital finance, and fast food to all. Religious fundamentalism, nationalism, and traditional sexual identities would melt away before the forces of "modernity" and empire. A relentless, technocratic rationality would sweep all in its wake, bringing a neoliberal utopia of free markets, free speech, and increasing productivity.

Nonetheless, as we have begun to experience the backlash against a global world founded on digital fungibility, the perils of appeals to nationalism, identity, and authenticity have become only too apparent. The collapse of Soviet Communism left an ideological vacuum that offered no recognized place from which to oppose global capitalism. What is the alternative? The anxieties and resentments produced by this new world order among those left behind are often manifested in assertions of xenophobia and particularity. This is what it supposedly means to be really American, truly Muslim, properly Chinese. The "other" is coming to take what is ours, and we must "defend" ourselves.

Digitalizing the Global Text is a collection of essays by an international group of scholars situated squarely at this nexus of forces. Together these writers examine how literature, culture, and philosophy in the global and digital age both enable the creation of these simultaneously utopian and dystopian worlds and offer a resistance to them.
categories: Business & Economics, Music & Theater, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:The Business of the Professional Theater
custom_byline1: Tim Donahue and Jim Patterson
custom_byline2: foreword by Ken Davenport
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custom_author_blurb:Tim Donahue holds an M.B.A. from the University of South Carolina, where he retired from the Department of Theatre and Dance as the director of marketing and development. He is the author of Playing for Prizes: America's Award for Best Drama and Best Musical and co-author of Theater Careers: A Realistic Guide, A Concise History of Theatre, and The Enjoyment of Theatre.

Jim Patterson (1935-2020) was Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Theatre at the University of South Carolina and the author of Stage Directing and Theatre in the Classroom: Grades 6–12 and co-author of The Enjoyment of Theatre and A Concise History of Theatre. A member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, Patterson had earned numerous awards for his work as a director and educator.
custom_reviews:"Stage Money offers a concise yet deftly drawn introduction to producing professional theater in America. The authors skillfully portray the critical relationship between the commercial and not-for-profit sectors and offer accessible explanations of the often-convoluted financial and artistic machinations that result in a theatrical production."—Steven Adler, author of On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way

"The authors of Stage Money illuminate current business models with breathtaking thoroughness and ground their observations in anecdotal evidence as well as facts and figures of budgeting, tax codes, union contracts, ticket pricing, and marketing and publicity concerns."—James Fisher, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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content: For decades roughly 80 percent of commercial Broadway productions have failed to recoup their original investments. In light of this shocking and harsh reality, how does the show go on? Tim Donahue and Jim Patterson answer this question and many others in this updated edition of their popular, straightforward guide to understanding professional theater finances and the economic realities of theater production.

This revised edition of Stage Money not only includes the latest financial information and illuminating examples of key concepts; it has been enhanced with a discussion of the stagehands' union plus a new chapter on marketing for the theater. These new elements combined with the essentials of the first edition create an expansive overview of the contemporary theater business. Stage Money is designed for theater enthusiasts and professionals interested in understanding the inner workings of this industry today and its challenges for the future.

Ken Davenport, two-time Tony Award winner, Broadway and Off Broadway theater producer, blogger, writer, and owner of Davenport Theatrical Enterprises writer, offers a foreword.
categories: South Carolina, Architecture & Engineering, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: John M. Bryan
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custom_author_blurb:John M. Bryan, professor emeritus of art and architectural history at the University of South Carolina, is a recipient of the South Carolina Order of the Palmetto, the highest civilian honor awarded by the governor of South Carolina. Bryan is the author of several books including Architectural History of the South Carolina College, 1801–1855; Robert Mills, America's First Architect; Creating the South Carolina Statehouse; and Biltmore Estate.
custom_reviews:"Expertly researched and richly illustrated, John Bryan's latest contribution to South Carolina's history provides both a chronicle of past achievements and a prelude to future accomplishments, acquisitions, and discoveries at what is one of the Palmetto State's most venerable landmarks and institutions."—John Sherrer, Historic Columbia

"Meticulously researched, this handsome tome explores the complex history of the South Caroliniana Library, weaving together layers of personal stories using collections held by the very institution it seeks to describe. Future scholars will be able to look to this volume for inspiration—and its excellent bibliography!"—Edward Blessing, South Caroliniana Library
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content: The South Caroliniana Library, located on the historic Horseshoe of the University of South Carolina campus in Columbia, is one of the premier research archives and special collections repositories in South Carolina and the American Southeast. The library's holdings—manuscripts, published materials, university archives, and visual materials—are essential to understanding the Palmetto State and Southern culture as it has evolved over the past 300 years.

When opened as the South Carolina College library in 1840 it was the first freestanding academic library building in the United States. Designed by Robert Mills, architect of the Washington Monument, it is built in the Greek Revival style and features a replica of the reading room that once housed Thomas Jefferson's personal library in the second Library of Congress. When the college built a larger main library (now known as the McKissick Museum) in 1940, the Mills building became the home of "Caroliniana"—published and unpublished materials relating to the history, literature, and culture of South Carolina.

Through a dedicated mining of the resources this library has held, art historian John M. Bryan crafted this comprehensive narrative history of the building's design, construction, and renovations, which he enhanced with personal entries from the diaries and letters of the students, professors, librarians, and politicians who crossed its threshold. A treasure trove of Caroliniana itself, this colorful volume, featuring 95 photographs and illustrations, celebrates a beautiful and historic structure, as well as the rich and vibrant history of the Palmetto State and the dedicated citizenry who have worked so hard to preserve it.

A foreword is provided by W. Eric Emerson, director, South Carolina Department of History and Archives.
categories: Southern History, Civil Rights, Memoir & Biography, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:A Memoir of Civil Rights Activism in the Deep South
custom_byline1: Donald A. Jelinek
custom_byline2: foreword by John Dittmer
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custom_author_blurb:Donald A. Jelinek (1934–2016) began his legal career on Wall Street but was best known for his work as a civil rights lawyer who defended members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s, the Native Americans who seized Alcatraz Island to dramatize their grievances against the federal government, and the indicted survivors of the Attica prison riot.
custom_reviews:"An autobiographical history clearly demonstrating how Black lives did not matter in the Jim Crow South. . . . A sharply etched memoir of the struggle for civil rights."—Kirkus Reviews

"This is the story of Jelinek's journey, from New York City to the South, from the nonviolence of the civil rights movement to SNCC and Black power. The battles he and others fought exemplify the gripping, jagged edge of the struggle. We need more such memoirs; they are cries for justice, still delayed."—Orville Vernon Burton, Clemson University

"Vivid, powerful, and deeply personal, this narrative of a white lawyer's experience serving the civil rights movement during the turbulent Black power era provides fresh new insights into the most important social movement of our history."—William H. Chafe, Duke University
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content: Inspired by a colleague's involvement in the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964, Wall Street attorney Donald A. Jelinek traveled to the Deep South to volunteer as a civil rights lawyer during his three-week summer vacation in 1965. He stayed for three years.

In White Lawyer, Black Power, Jelinek recounts the battles he fought in defense of militant civil rights activists and rural African Americans, risking his career and his life to further the struggle for racial equality as an organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and an attorney for the Lawyers Constitutional Defense Committee of the American Civil Liberties Union. Jelinek arrived in the Deep South at a pivotal moment in the movement's history as frustration over the failure of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to improve the daily lives of southern blacks led increasing numbers of activists to question the doctrine of nonviolence.

Jelinek offers a fresh perspective that emphasizes the complex dynamics and relationships that shaped the post-1965 black power era. Replete with sharply etched, complex portraits of the personalities Jelinek encountered, from the rank-and-file civil rights workers who formed the backbone of the movement to the younger, more radical, up-and-coming leaders like Stokely Carmichael and H. "Rap" Brown, White Lawyer, Black Power provides a powerful and sometimes harrowing firsthand account of one of the most significant struggles in American history.

John Dittmer, professor emeritus of American history at DePauw University and author of Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, provides a foreword.
categories: Fiction & Folklore, paperback, ebook, Books,
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custom_byline1: Nancy Roberts
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custom_author_blurb:Nancy Roberts (1924–2008) was a popular Southern writer who frequently lectured on folklore and creative writing. She is the author of more than twenty books that together have sold more than a million copies. Roberts earned a degree in comparative literature from the University of North Carolina.
custom_reviews:"Just about everybody likes a good ghost story. And ghost hunter/author Nancy Roberts . . . has put together as shivery a selection of other worldly tales as you're likely to find anywhere. . . . And whether you believe in ghosts or not, these tales are guaranteed to give you a chill, especially before you go into a dark room alone."—Southern Living
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content: Nancy Roberts has often been described to as the "First Lady of American Folklore" and the title is well deserved. Throughout her decades-long career, Roberts documented supernatural experiences and interviewed hundreds of people about their recollections of encounters with the supernatural.

This nationally renowned writer began her undertaking in this ghostly realm as a freelance writer for the Charlotte Observer. Encouraged by Carl Sandburg, who enjoyed her stories and articles, Roberts wrote her first book in 1958. Aptly called a "custodian of the twilight zone" by Southern Living magazine, Roberts based her suspenseful stories on interviews and her rich knowledge of American folklore. Her stories were always rooted in history, which earned her a certificate of commendation from the American Association of State and Local History for her books on the Carolinas and Appalachia.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Işıl Özcan
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custom_author_blurb:Işıl Özcan teaches American literature at Dokuz Eylül University in Turkey. She has published on classic and contemporary American literature, the French nouveau-roman, and world cinema.
custom_reviews:"Isil Ozcan comprehensively maps the vast reach of William T. Vollmann's work. She indeed understands him (in all of his rich complexity), and so will any reader who enlists her aid in reading Vollmann, who is North America's foremost living novelist, and its greatest non-fiction writer too."—Robert L. Caserio, Penn State, University Park

"Understanding William T. Vollmann is exactly the kind of study Vollmann's writing deserves: meticulously documented, rich in perceptive critical insights, wide-ranging and inspired in giving literary and theoretical contexts for Vollmann's work, including notions of deep time and planetary literature. This book is an invaluable resource for seasoned Vollmann readers and newcomers alike."—Daniel Lukes, editor of Conversations with William T. Vollmann

"This is a perfect introduction to Vollmann. Özcan's fresh and incisive arguments reliably guide newcomers while rewarding veteran readers. Her engagements with his interrogations of injustices past and present, and her articulation of his place in the literary moment, highlight especially well his importance in the global era. An essential book about an essential writer."—Christopher K. Coffman, Boston University
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content: In Understanding William T. Vollmann, Işıl Özcan studies the maturing career of one of the most important voices in contemporary letters. Vollmann's major works of fiction and nonfiction include his National Book Award winner, Europe Central; his highly acclaimed Seven Dreams novels; and his magnum opus, Rising Up and Rising Down: Some Thoughts on Violence, Urgent Means, and Justifications. Özcan examines the common threads that interlace Vollmann's corpus and grapples with the depth and complexity of his massive output. In her readings of Vollmann's works, she identifies a rich but accessible set of themes that he explores afresh in each text, including death, war, violence, suffering, and love.

Vollmann has written in many genres, and his writing is informed by his extensive research and travels around the world, his familiarity with red-light zones, and his war correspondence. The highly subjective and participative nature of much his writing has foregrounded his personality to such an extent that he became simultaneously a cult figure and a notorious adventurer. In her readings Özcan contends that Vollmann compels our attention because he registers a diversity of voices and discourses that makes us hear what the subjugated, the unrecognized, the weak, and the marginalized have to say; the scope and the force of Vollmann's openness to the Other is inseparable from his method and conduct.

In addition to close readings of Vollmann's texts, Özcan also examines his influences and literary connections, tracing his ties to John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, James Agee, and Danilo Kiš and situating him not only in the American canon but also in the longer duration of world literature.
categories: Understanding Contemporary British Literature, World Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Matthew J. Bruccoli,
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custom_byline1: Brian Diemert
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custom_author_blurb:Brian Diemert is a professor of English at Brescia University College in London, Ontario. He is the author of Graham Greene's Thrillers and the 1930s and has published several essays on crime fiction and on British and American writing in the twentieth century and beyond.
custom_reviews:"Understanding Kate Atkinson is well and accessibly written, critically insightful and judicious, and well-researched and informed. It provides those wishing for a deeper, more comprehensive grasp of Atkinson's work with an engaging, single-volume resource."—Brian Shaffer, Rhodes College

"One doesn't need to be a detective, a history buff, or a literature professor to appreciate Kate Atkinson's ever-evolving oeuvre, but it certainly helps to find Brian Diemert capably wearing all of these hats (and more) over the course of this study. Understanding Kate Atkinson is a marvelous achievement—one that will help us to read, teach, and talk seriously about Atkinson's fiction for many years to come."—Melanie Micir, Washington University in St. Louis
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content: Best known for her Jackson Brodie series of detective novels, which were adapted into the BBC television series Case Histories, Kate Atkinson is the author of eleven novels, two plays, and a collection of short stories. Her literary awards include the 1995 Whitbread Award for a first novel and book of the year for Behind the Scenes at the Museum and the Costa Book Awards for best novel in 2013 and 2015 for Life after Life and A God in Ruins.

In this first book-length study of Atkinson's literary career, Brian Diemert examines the evolution of her novels: the playful and self-conscious work of the 1990s, the detective series novels, the books that examine Britain's history and its legacy of conflict and trauma related to World War II, and the most recent return to mystery. Diemert identifies her pattern of weaving multiple narrative strands into intricate plots that create the mystery at the heart of all her tales. He traces her development of narrative technique and thematic preoccupations of women's vulnerability within patriarchy and the complications of absent or disengaged parents. While her fiction is marked by allusiveness and humor, it remains profound and often touching as it explores the myths of British history and, particularly, women's lives.
categories: Religious Studies, Civil Rights, African American Studies, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Philosophy, Civil Rights, and the Search for Common Ground
custom_byline1: Kipton E. Jensen
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custom_author_blurb:Kipton E. Jensen is an associate professor of philosophy at Morehouse College, the director of the Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership, and the codirector of the International Comparative Labor Studies program. He earned a doctorate in philosophy from Marquette University and was a Fulbright Scholar at Martin-Luther-Universität. Jensen is the author of Hegel: Hovering and Parallel Discourses and coeditor of Howard Thurman's Sermons on the Parables.
custom_reviews:"Kipton Jensen has done a superb job here of extracting a philosophy from Howard Thurman's works. Sifting and sorting, from William James and Josiah Royce, from Benjamin Mays and Martin Luther King, from Gandhi and earlier Indian proponents of ahimsa and satyagraha, and from many other philosophers from the past and from later on, for instance James Cone, Cornell West, and Eddie Glaude, he has pictured Thurman as a significant American philosopher."—Robert Cummings Neville, Professor emeritus, Boston University
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content: Although he is best known as a mentor to the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., Howard Thurman (1900-1981) was an exceptional philosopher and public intellectual in his own right. In Howard Thurman: Philosophy, Civil Rights, and the Search for Common Ground, Kipton E. Jensen provides new ways of understanding Thurman's foundational role in and broad influence on the civil rights movement and argues persuasively that he is one of the unsung heroes of that time. While Thurman's profound influence on King has been documented, Jensen shows how Thurman's reach extended to an entire generation of activists.

Thurman espoused a unique brand of personalism. Jensen explicates Thurman's construction of a philosophy on nonviolence and the political power of love. Showing how Thurman was a "social activist mystic" as well as a pragmatist, Jensen explains how these beliefs helped provide the foundation for King's notion of the beloved community.

Throughout his life Thurman strove to create a climate of "inner unity of fellowship that went beyond the barriers of race, class, and tradition." In this volume Jensen meticulously documents and analyzes Thurman as a philosopher, activist, and peacemaker and illuminates his vital and founding role in and contributions to the monumental achievements of the civil rights era.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Marshall Boswell
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custom_author_blurb:Marshall Boswell is the author of John Updike's Rabbit Tetralogy: Mastered Irony in Motion and The Wallace Effect: David Foster Wallace and the Contemporary Literary Imagination, as well as two works of fiction, Trouble with Girls and Alternative Atlanta. With Stephen Burn he is the coeditor of A Companion to David Foster Wallace Studies and the editor of David Foster Wallace and "The Long Thing": New Essays on the Novels. Boswell is a professor of English literature at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee.
custom_reviews:"Understanding David Foster Wallace places incisive close readings in a rich context that Wallace's fiction emerged from and shaped—including literary postmodernism, popular culture, philosophies of language, politics, and ethics—to create an overview that is as accessible as it is illuminating. An excellent place to start and return to for scholars, teachers, students, and all readers of Wallace's challenging work."—Mary K. Holland, State University of New York, New Paltz

"Understanding David Foster Wallace is the first critical study of Wallace that I ever got my hands on and it remains a wonderful introduction to his work. Boswell writes on Wallace with clarity, precision, and a graceful authority. Readers will come away with a firm grasp of Wallace's major themes and aesthetic concerns."—Ralph Clare, Boise State University

"Boswell reads like a novelist and a critic, with a sensitivity to craft and narrative design married to a lucid and eclectic grasp of Wallace's myriad theoretical and intellectual contexts. If you read just one book about Wallace's fiction, this is the study to read."—Stephen Burn, University of Glasgow

"This welcome edition builds impressively on Boswell's seminal work in its previous incarnations. The volume is rounded out by two chapters on Oblivion and The Pale King, making it a complete and cohesive guide to Wallace's oeuvre. Managing to balance astute observation and accessible style, Understanding David Foster Wallace is indispensable for seasoned scholars and new readers alike."—Clare Hayes-Brady, University College Dublin
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content: Since its publication in 2003, Understanding David Foster Wallace has served as an accessible introduction to the rich array of themes and formal innovations that have made Wallace's fiction so popular and influential. A seminal text in the burgeoning field of David Foster Wallace studies, the original edition of Understanding David Foster Wallace was nevertheless incomplete as it addressed only his first four works of fiction—namely the novels The Broom of the System and Infinite Jest and the story collections Girl with Curious Hair and Brief Interviews with Hideous Men. This revised edition adds two new chapters covering his final story collection, Oblivion, and his posthumous novel, The Pale King.

Tracing Wallace's relationship to modernism and postmodernism, this volume provides close readings of all his major works of fiction. Although critics sometimes label Wallace a postmodern writer, Boswell argues that he should be regarded as the nervous leader of some still-unnamed (and perhaps unnamable) third wave of modernism. In charting a new direction for literary practice, Wallace does not seek to overturn postmodernism, nor does he call for a return to modernism. Rather his work moves resolutely forward while hoisting the baggage of modernism and postmodernism heavily, but respectfully, on its back.

Like the books that serve as its primary subject, Boswell's study directly confronts such arcane issues as postmodernism, information theory, semiotics, the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and poststructuralism, yet it does so in a way that is comprehensible to a wide and general readership—the very same readership that has enthusiastically embraced Wallace's challenging yet entertaining and redemptive fiction.
categories: South Carolina, U.S. History, American Revolution, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Charleston Rebels in St. Augustine during the American Revolution
custom_byline1: James Waring McCrady and C. L. Bragg
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custom_author_blurb:James Waring McCrady is a founding member and president of the Sewanee Trust for Historical Preservation in Tennessee, past president of the Franklin County Historical Association, and the editor of the association's journal, Historical Review. McCrady is a retired chair of the French Department at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.

C. L. "Chip" Bragg is the author or co-author of Distinction in Every Service: Brigadier General Marcellus A. Stovall, C.S.A.; the critically acclaimed Never for Want of Powder: The Confederate Powder Works in Augusta, Georgia; Crescent Moon over Carolina: William Moultrie and American Liberty; and Martyr of the American Revolution: The Execution of Isaac Hayne, South Carolinian.
custom_reviews:"Bragg and McCrady have highlighted a frequently neglected topic of the Revolutionary War in the South: the travails of men who were torn from families and familiar surroundings, often not knowing what awaited them in this forced removal from South Carolina. Engaging and original."—Carl Borick, Charleston Museum

"A detailed, fascinating account of a neglected facet of the history of the American Revolution in South Carolina."—Walter Edgar, author of South Carolina: A History

"Patriots in Exile fills a significant gap in the history of the American Revolution and broadens the perspective by exploring events that took place outside the limits of the thirteen colonies. This book will appeal to both academic and general readers, particularly those whose interests are focused on the South."—Jim Piecuch, author of Three Peoples, One King

"McCrady and Bragg shed new light on how in 1780 the patriot elite of Charleston, South Carolina, came to be exiled to one of the most isolated corners of the British empire. While not quite a gulag or Guantanamo Bay, St. Augustine served a similar function as a place where the British could make disappear individuals deemed to be dangerous enemies of the state."—David K. Wilson, author of The Southern Strategy: Britain's Conquest of South Carolina and Georgia, 1775–1780
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content: In the months following the May 1780 capture of Charleston, South Carolina, by combined British and loyalist forces, British soldiers arrested sixty-three paroled American prisoners and transported them to the borderland town of St. Augustine, East Florida—territory under British control since the French and Indian War. In Patriots in Exile, James Waring McCrady and C. L. Bragg chronicle the banishment of these elite southerners, the hardships endured by their families, and the plight of the enslaved men and women who accompanied them, as well as the motives of their British captors.

McCrady and Bragg thoroughly examine the exile from the standpoint of the British who governed occupied Charleston, the families left behind, the armies in the field, the Continental Congress, and finally the Jacksonboro Assembly of January and February 1782. Using primary sources and archival materials, the authors develop biographical sketches of each exile and illuminate important facets of the American Revolution's southern theater. While they shared a common fate, the exiles were a diverse lot of tradesmen, artisans, prominent civilians, and military officers—among them three signers of the Declaration of Independence. Although they had clear socioeconomic differences, most were unrepentant patriots.

In this first comprehensive examination and narrative history of these patriots, McCrady and Bragg reveal how the exiles navigated their new surroundings within the context of a revolutionary conflict that involved various imperial powers of the Old World—Britain, France, and Spain—and American colonists seeking to create an independent nation.
categories: South Carolina, Southern History, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Settling South Carolina, 1670-1720
custom_byline1: John J. Navin
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custom_author_blurb:John J. Navin is a professor of history at Coastal Carolina University, where he teaches early American history and conducts research on community, race, and violence in colonial America. He holds a master's degree in American studies from Boston College and a Ph.D. in history from Brandeis University.
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content: The Grim Years: Settling South Carolina, 1670-1720 is a graphic account of South Carolina's tumultuous beginnings, when calamity, violence, and ruthless exploitation were commonplace. With extraordinary detail and analysis, John J. Navin reveals the hardships that were experienced by people of all ethnicities and all stations in life during the first half-century of South Carolina's existence—years of misery caused by nature, pathogens, greed, and recklessness.

From South Carolina's founding in 1670 through 1720, a cadre of men rose to political and economic prominence, while ordinary colonists, enslaved Africans, and indigenous groups became trapped in a web of violence and oppression. Navin explains how eight English aristocrats, the Lords Proprietors, came to possess the vast Carolina grant and then enacted elaborate plans to recruit and control colonists as part of a grand moneymaking scheme. But those plans went awry, and the mainstays of the economy became hog and cattle ranching, lumber products, naval stores, deerskin exports, and the calamitous Indian slave trade. The settlers' relentless pursuit of wealth set the colony on a path toward prosperity but also toward a fatal dependency on slave labor. Rice would produce immense fortunes in South Carolina, but not during the colony's first fifty years. Religious and political turmoil instigated by settlers from Barbados eventually led to a total rejection of proprietary authority.

Using a variety of primary sources, Navin describes challenges that colonists faced, setbacks they experienced, and the effects of policies and practices initiated by elites and proprietors. Storms, fires, epidemics, and armed conflicts destroyed property, lives, and dreams. Threatened by the Native Americans they exploited, by the Africans they enslaved, and by their French and Spanish rivals, South Carolinians lived in continual fear. For some it was the price they paid for financial success. But for most there were no riches, and the possibility of a sudden, violent death was overshadowed by the misery of their day-to-day existence.
categories: Political Science, U.S. History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Why South Carolina's Presidential Primary Matters
custom_byline1: H. Gibbs Knotts and Jordan M. Ragusa
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custom_author_blurb:H. Gibbs Knotts is a professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at the College of Charleston and codirects the American Politics Research Team. Along with Chris Cooper, he co-authored The Resilience of Southern Identity: Why the South Still Matters in the Minds of Its People. Knotts has published articles in the Journal of Politics, Public Administration Review, Political Research Quarterly, American Politics Research, Social Forces, and Southern Cultures.

Jordan M. Ragusa is an associate professor of political science, codirects the American Politics Research Team, and is a research fellow in the Center for Public Choice and Market Process at the College of Charleston. His work has been published in Political Research Quarterly, Journal of Political Science, American Politics Research, Political Science Quarterly, Research and Politics, Perspectives on Politics, and the Journal of Elections, Public Opinion, and Parties.
custom_reviews:"Combining rich archival research with statistical analysis, Knotts and Ragusa offer a comprehensive look at South Carolina presidential primaries. An excellent primer for political practitioners and journalists, the book provides a compelling argument for why South Carolina enjoys an early spot on the presidential primary calendars of both parties."—Danielle Vinson, Furman University

"Knotts and Ragusa provide a thorough look at how South Carolina became the focal point of presidential primary elections, and why it remains such a critical stop on the presidential primary map for both Democrats and Republicans."—Former South Carolina Governor Jim Hodges
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content: Every four years presidential hopefuls and the national media travel the primary election circuit through Iowa and New Hampshire. Once the dust settles in these states, the nation's focus turns to South Carolina, the first primary in the delegate-rich South. Historically Iowa and New Hampshire have dominated the news because they are first, not because of their predictive ability or representativeness. In First in the South, H. Gibbs Knotts and Jordan M. Ragusa make the case for shifting the national focus to South Carolina because of its clarifying and often-predictive role in selecting presidential nominees for both the Republican and Democratic Parties.

To establish the foundation for their claim, Knotts and Ragusa begin with an introduction to the fundamentals of South Carolina's primary. They then detail how South Carolina achieved its coveted "First in the South" status and examine the increasing importance of this primary since the first contest in 1980. Throughout the book they answer key questions about the Palmetto State's process, using both qualitative information—press reports, primary sources, archival documents, and oral histories—and quantitative data—election results, census data, and exit polls.

Through their research Knotts and Ragusa argue that a key factor that makes the South Carolina primary so important is the unique demographic makeup of the state's Democratic and Republican electorates. Knotts and Ragusa also identify major factors that have bolstered candidates' campaigns and propelled them to victory in South Carolina.While the evidence confirms the conventional wisdom about endorsements, race, and being from a southern state, their analysis offers hope to political newcomers and candidates who raise less money than their competitors. Succinct and accessible, First in the South is a glimpse behind the curtain of the often-mysterious presidential primary process.
categories: Southern History, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:A New History of North Carolina
custom_byline1: Milton Ready
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custom_author_blurb:Milton Ready is professor emeritus of history at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. The author of numerous works on North Carolina and Georgia history, he has received the E. Merton Coulter Award for the writing of Georgia history. His works include Remembering Asheville; Mystical Madison: The History of a Mountain Region; Oh Carolina!, and, with Kenneth Coleman, edited numerous volumes of The Colonial Records of Georgia.
custom_reviews:"The most original popular history of North Carolina in decades."—Lindley S. Butler, coeditor of The North Carolina Experience: An Interpretive and Documentary History

"Milton Ready provides a skillful and well-written addition to the state's historical literature."—Jeffrey Crow, author of New Voyages to Carolina: Reinterpreting North Carolina History

"The Tar Heel State constitutes an eminently readable, fast-paced, and thorough survey of North Carolina's past."—Alan D. Watson, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

"The Tar Heel State is a scholarly and compelling story of the divergent experiences of the state's masses—full of interesting facts and details that are often absent in other studies on the same subject."—Joyce Blackwell, president, The Institute for Educational Research, Development and Training

"It is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand the history of North Carolina and will be of immense benefit to those interested in the roles African Americans have played throughout the history of the state."—Olen Cole Jr., North Carolina A&T State University
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content: When first released in 2005, The Tar Heel State was celebrated as a comprehensive contribution to North Carolina's historical record. In this revised edition historian Milton Ready brings the text up to date, sharpens his narrative on the periods surrounding the American Revolution and the Civil War and offers new chapters on the 1920s; World War II and the 1950s; and the confrontation between Jim Hunt, North Carolina's longest-serving governor, and Jesse Helms, a transformational, if controversial, political presence in the state for more than thirty years.

Ready's distinctive view of the state's history integrates tales of famous pioneers, statesmen, soldiers, farmers, and captains of industry; as well as community leaders with often-marginalized voices, including those of African Americans, women, and the LGBTQ+ community that have roiled North Carolina for decades.

This beautifully illustrated volume gives readers a view of North Carolina that encompasses perspectives from the coast, the Tobacco Road region, the Piedmont, and the mountains. From the civil rights struggle to the building of research triangles, triads, and parks, Ready recounts the people, events, and dramatic demographic shifts since the 1990s, as well as the state's role in the rise of modern political conservatism and subsequent emergence as a modern megastate. In a concluding chapter Ready assesses the current state of North Carolina, noting the conflicting legacies of progressivism and conservatism that continue to influence the state's political, social, and cultural identities.
categories: Civil War, Literary Studies, U.S. History, William Gilmore Simms Initiatives, ebook, hardcover, Books, Hagstette, Todd,
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custom_subtitle:Selected Civil War and Reconstruction Newspaper Editorials by William Gilmore Simms
custom_byline1: edited by Jeffery J. Rogers
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custom_author_blurb:Jeffery J. Rogers is a professor of history at Gordon State College in Barnesville, Georgia, and is the author of A Southern Writer and the Civil War: The Confederate Imagination of William Gilmore Simms.
custom_reviews:"This expertly curated new collection brings together Simms's writings on the Civil War and its immediate aftermath. This valuable assemblage will aid modern scholars immensely as they seek to understand how the region's preeminent novelist and journalist thought about the future of the region even as his own reputation was beginning to fade into the past."—Jonathan Daniel Wells, University of Michigan
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content: William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) was a novelist, poet, and essayist and was considered the South's premier literary figure at the height of his popularity. No less an authority than Edgar Allen Poe remarked of Simms that "he has surpassed, we think, any of his countrymen" as a novelist. Simms's literary achievements include more than twenty major novels, several volumes of poetry, and biographies of important figures in American history.

Perhaps the least considered parts of Simms's overall body of writings are those he did for newspapers, the most interesting of which are from the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Writing War and Reunion offers a selection of the best of those so that we can track Simms's thoughts about, and reactions to, the conflict, from its beginnings through to its conclusion and into the early years of Reconstruction. These works provide a valuable insight into how a prominent southern intellectual interpreted and participated in these momentous events in U.S. history.

In the decades following the Civil War, Simms's reputation suffered a steady decline. Because of his associations with the antebellum South, slavery, and Confederate defeat, as well as changes in literary tastes, Simms came to be regarded as a talented but failed Southern author of a bygone era. Today a robust scholarly literature exists that has reexamined Simms, his literary works, and previous scholarly judgments and finds him to have been an important figure in the development of nineteenth-century American literature and worthy of serious study.
categories: South Carolina, Southern History, African American Studies, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:The Clash over Civil Rights in South Carolina
custom_byline1: Claudia Smith Brinson
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custom_author_blurb:Claudia Smith Brinson, a newspaper journalist in South Carolina for more than thirty years, spent much of her career with Knight Ridder media company as a senior writer, writing coach, associate editor, and columnist. She taught writing at the University of South Carolina and directed the Writing for Print and Digital Media major at Columbia College. Brinson won more than thirty state, regional, and national awards, including Knight Ridder's Award of Excellence and an O. Henry Award for short fiction, and she was a member of the Pulitzer finalist team covering Hurricane Hugo.
custom_reviews:"If you think nothing of significance involving civil rights happened in South Carolina read Stories of Struggle. If you think South Carolina lacked drama, cruelty, violence, and above all courage during the civil rights era read this book. If you are not familiar with James M. Hinton, Cecil Ivory, Mae Frances Moultrie, Rosetta Simmons, and many others, read this book. There are no statues of these men and women, but they are some of the toughest, bravest, and most resourceful people that South Carolina has ever produced."—William C. Hine, author of South Carolina State University: A Black Land-Grant College in Jim Crow America

"From the battlefront of social change in America, and especially South Carolina, Stories of Struggle brings to life personalities not known by many who played significant roles pioneering events that initiated the civil rights movement. This is a major contribution to understanding the people behind the scenes who led the fight."—Cecil Williams, photographer and founder, Cecil Williams Civil Rights Museum

"Stories of Struggle is a powerful book. Claudia Smith Brinson has combined unforgettable personal remembrances with traditional public sources to give all twenty-first century South Carolinians an important, thought-provoking resource for our challenging times."—Walter Edgar, author of South Carolina: A History

"Stories of Struggle is an inspiring and engaging narrative of pivotal moments in the twentieth century Black freedom struggle in South Carolina. Particularly riveting are the insightful portraits of an amazing cast of Black freedom fighters who advanced the brave and enduring struggle aimed at both creating an egalitarian society and uprooting white supremacy in South Carolina and beyond."—Waldo E. Martin, University of California, Berkeley

"Stories of Struggle is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the fight for racial justice in South Carolina. The riveting stories are horrifying in their depiction of what African American activists in the state endured, yet inspiring and uplifting in their description of what all these heroes accomplished. The book is a tremendous contribution to the history of South Carolina and the nation, and to the history of the civil rights movement."—Marjorie J. Spruill, author of Divided We Stand: The Battle Over Women's Rights and Family Values That Polarized American Politics

"In Stories of Struggle, Claudia Smith Brinson does an exceptional job in detailing in depth the full story of the significant role black South Carolinians played in the ultimate struggle that led to the U. S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that brought an end to racial segregation in public schools and ultimately the passage of 1964 Civil Right Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act that followed."—Jack Bass, author of The Palmetto State: The Making of Modern South Carolina
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content: In this pioneering study of the long and arduous struggle for civil rights in South Carolina, longtime journalist Claudia Smith Brinson details the lynchings, beatings, bombings, cross burnings, death threats, arson, and venomous hatred that black South Carolinians endured—as well as the astonishing courage, devotion, dignity, and compassion of those who risked their lives for equality.

Through extensive research and interviews with more than one hundred fifty civil rights activists, many of whom had never shared their stories with anyone, Brinson chronicles twenty pivotal years of petitioning, preaching, picketing, boycotting, marching, and holding sit-ins. Participants' use of nonviolent direct action altered the landscape of civil rights in South Carolina and reverberated throughout the South.

These firsthand accounts include the unsung petitioners who risked their lives by supporting Summerton's Briggs v. Elliot, a lawsuit that led to the historic Brown v. Board of Education decision; the thousands of students who were arrested and jailed in 1960 for protests in Rock Hill, Orangeburg, Denmark, Columbia, and Sumter; and the black female employees and leaders who defied a governor and his armed troops during the 1969 hospital strike in Charleston.

Brinson also highlights contributions made by remarkable but lesser-known activists, including James M. Hinton Sr., president of the South Carolina Conference of Branches of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; Thomas W. Gaither, Congress of Racial Equality field secretary and scout for the Freedom Rides; Charles F. McDew, a South Carolina State College student and co-founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and Mary Moultrie, grassroots leader of the 1969 hospital workers' strike.

These intimate stories of courage and conviction, both heartbreaking and inspiring, shine a light on the progress achieved by nonviolent civil rights activists while also revealing white South Carolinians' often violent resistance to change. Although significant racial disparities remain, the sacrifices of these brave men and women produced real progress—and hope for the future.
categories: World History, South Carolina, African American Studies, Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, David Gleeson, Simon Lewis, John White,
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custom_subtitle:Race, Status, and Identity in the Urban Americas
custom_byline1: John Garrison Marks
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custom_author_blurb:John Garrison Marks works for the American Association for State and Local History and holds a Ph.D. in history from Rice University. He is the coeditor of Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations: An Atlantic World Anthology and his work has appeared in Southwestern Historical Quarterly and Atlantic Studies.
custom_reviews:"An important contribution to the history of black freedom, this comparative study of free people of color in Charleston and Cartagena is equally attentive to the broader Atlantic and to local economic, social, demographic, and institutional circumstances. The result is a rich, textured, and locally grounded reconstruction of people of African descent's relentless pursuit for standing, respectability, family and community in the Americas."—Alejandro de la Fuente, Harvard University

"In Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery John Marks has produced a carefully researched and innovative study of how enslaved people in the Atlantic slave ports of Cartagena and Charleston achieved freedom and sought respectability under very different social, economic, and political systems. The key he argues, was the access to public institutions free people of color enjoyed in the Spanish city, and the commitment Charlestonians made to preserve slavery in perpetuity. Based on deep archival research in Colombia, Spain, and the United States, this is a welcome contribution to the study of slavery, racism, and emancipation."—Jane Landers, Vanderbilt University

"Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery makes a crucial contribution to the history of the Atlantic world. By linking the lives of free blacks in Charleston, South Carolina, and Cartagena, Colombia, Marks's work bridges the sites of Atlantic slavery, treating disparate geographies as fundamentally linked and raising broad and important questions about the nature of black freedom. Marks's deeply researched and beautifully written study is an important work that will impact the fields of Latin American history, North American history, the histories of slavery and freedom, and beyond."—Jennifer L. Morgan, New York University
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content: Prior to the abolition of slavery, thousands of African-descended people in the Americas lived in freedom. Their efforts to navigate daily life and negotiate the boundaries of racial difference challenged the foundations of white authority—and linked the Americas together.

In Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery John Garrison Marks examines how these individuals built lives in freedom for themselves and their families in two of the Atlantic World's most important urban centers: Cartagena, along the Caribbean coast of modern-day Colombia, and Charleston, in the lowcountry of North America's Atlantic coast. Marks reveals how skills, knowledge, reputation, and personal relationships helped free people of color improve their fortunes and achieve social distinction in ways that undermined whites' claims to racial superiority.

Built upon research conducted on three continents, this book takes a comparative approach to understanding the contours of black freedom in the Americas. It reveals in new detail the creative and persistent attempts of free black people to improve their lives and that of their families. It examines how various paths to freedom, responses to the Haitian Revolution, opportunities to engage in skilled labor, involvement with social institutions, and the role of the church all helped shape the lived experience of free people of color in the Atlantic World.

As free people of color worked to improve their individual circumstances, staking claims to rights, privileges, and distinctions not typically afforded to those of African descent, they engaged with white elites and state authorities in ways that challenged prevailing racial attitudes. While whites across the Americas shared common doubts about the ability of African-descended people to survive in freedom or contribute meaningfully to society, free black people in Cartagena, Charleston, and beyond conducted themselves in ways that exposed cracks in the foundations of American racial hierarchies. Their actions represented early contributions to the long fight for recognition, civil rights, and racial justice that continues today.
categories: Memoir & Biography, World Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:On J. K. Rowling's Fantasies and Other Fictions
custom_byline1: Tison Pugh
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custom_author_blurb:Tison Pugh is Pegasus Professor of English at the University of Central Florida. He is the author or editor of more than twenty books in such fields as children's literature, medieval literature, and southern literature.
custom_reviews:"This engaging and well-researched book explains how J. K. Rowling builds on five key literary genres and does a brilliant job illuminating those genres, such that the book is both an overview of Harry Potter as literature and an introduction to literature by way of Harry Potter. Highly recommended."—Kenneth Kidd, University of Florida

"In his eminently readable Harry Potter and Beyond, Tison Pugh offers keen insights into race, gender, queerness, and especially genre as he illuminates Rowling's fantasy fiction and also her mystery novels."—Beverly Clark, Wheaton College

"Contextualizing Rowling's works within and beyond the Harry Potter franchise in terms of genre, ideology, critical response, and artistic achievement, Tison Pugh's new book offers an informed, appreciative, and approachable assessment."—Claudia Nelson, Texas A&M University

"an enlightening and enjoyable read, packing a wide range of scholarship into a short and readable format. It is an excellent introduction to the critical theory surrounding Potter as well as a worthwhile addition to the collection of a seasoned researcher."—MuggleNet

"In this fresh and useful addition to the ever-growing critical canon on Rowling, Pugh encourages readers to explore Rowling's works through and across literary genres including school story, bildungsroman, mystery, and allegory—all elements Rowling imbues in her work... the book is both deeply critical and entertainingly readable... The multisection bibliography provides a must-read list for literary criticism, Harry Potter studies, and wider canonical literature. This work will be useful for those engaged in genre or author studies, young adult literature, or literary criticism more broadly."—Choice
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content: Harry Potter and Beyond explores J. K. Rowling's beloved best-selling series and its virtuoso reimagining of British literary traditions. Weaving together elements of fantasy, the school-story novel, detective fiction, allegory, and bildungsroman, the Harry Potter novels evade simplistic categorization as children's or fantasy literature. Because the Potter series both breaks new ground and adheres to longstanding narrative formulas, readers can enhance their enjoyment of these epic adventures by better understanding their place in literary history.

Along with the seven foundational novels of the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and Beyond assesses the extraordinary range of supplementary material concerning the young wizard and his allies, including the films of the books, the subsequent film series of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, the theatrical spectacle Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, and a range of other Potter-inspired narratives. Beyond the world of Potter, Pugh surveys Rowling's literary fiction The Casual Vacancy and her detective series featuring Cormoran Strike, written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. Through this comprehensive overview of Rowling's body of work, Pugh reveals the vast web of connections between yesteryear's stories and Rowling's vivid creations.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Heike Paul
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custom_author_blurb:Heike Paul is chair of American studies at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nurnberg and director of the Bavarian American Academy in Munich. She is the author of The Myths That Made America and the editor and co-editor of numerous books on literature, popular culture, and political culture. In 2018 she received the prestigious Leibniz Prize of the German Research Foundation.
custom_reviews:"An introduction to Stewart O'Nan's novelistic rethinking of American mythology that is as shrewd as it is appealing. Uncovering the cultural and historical contexts to the everyday gothic and the literature of care informing his slice-of-life aesthetics, Heike Paul deftly draws us into his precarious fictional worlds. Her critical retellings of these stories makes them come alive on the page in a new light. This is, indeed the perfect invitation to read this versatile author."—Elisabeth Bronfen, University of Zurich

"Heike Paul's careful and perceptive reading of Stewart O'Nan's work is a long overdue book-length appreciation of one of the major contemporary American writers too easily overlooked by academic critics. In her brilliant analysis, she reveals precarious situations experienced by O'Nan's small-town people in their everyday gothic and mythological worlds."—Alfred Hornung, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz

"Heike Paul's study of Stewart O'Nan's oeuvre is more than a landmark in the scholarship on this prolific, versatile, and understudied author. While capturing crucial features of O'Nan's world, some of her critical insights—such as the notions of "the everyday gothic" and "literary care work"—offer perceptive new ways of understanding broader trends in contemporary fiction."—Donatella Izzo, University of Naples "L'Orientale"

"One of the chief distinctions of Understanding Stewart O'Nan, other than Heike Paul's superb prose and impressive scholarship, is the illuminating conjuncture each chapter draws between the changes in genre of O'Nan's novels and the shifting dispositions of American politics and popular culture."—Donald E. Pease, Dartmouth College

"Steward O'Nan's greatest gift as a writer is his ability to attend to everyday, seemingly ordinary American life with great candor and compassion. Heike Paul's capacious and incisive study introduces readers to the significance of the various cultural myths O'Nan reinterprets throughout his extensive literary oeuvre."—Silvia Schultermandl, University of Graz
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content: This first book-length study of Stewart O'Nan's work offers a comprehensive introduction to his writings and carefully examines recurring thematic concerns and stylistic characteristics of his novels. The author of eighteen novels, several works of nonfiction, and two short-story collections, O'Nan received the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society's Gold Medal for best novel for Snow Angels and the Drew Heinz Prize for In the Walled City. In 1996 Granta magazine named him one of the Twenty Best Young American Novelists.

In Understanding Stewart O'Nan, Heike Paul appraises O'Nan's oeuvre to date, including his popular multigenerational trilogy of novels—Wish You Were Here; Emily, Alone; and Henry, Himself—that received enthusiastic reviews in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Publisher's Weekly, and the Guardian.

Paul argues that O'Nan is not only a writer of popular fiction but also has developed into a major literary voice worthy of canonical status and of having a firm place in school, college, and university curricula. To this end Paul analyzes his use of formulas of long-standing popular American genres, such as the Western and the gothic tale, as he re-invents them in innovative and complex ways creating a style that Paul describes as "everyday gothic." She also offers a critical examination of O'Nan's treatment of American myths and vivid descriptions of struggling middle class settings and individuals who lead precarious lives. Paul believes this first critical study of O'Nan's collected works will be instrumental in building a critical archive and analysis of his oeuvre.
categories: World History, African American Studies, Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World, ebook, hardcover, Books, Women's & Gender Studies,
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custom_subtitle:Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Atlantic World
custom_byline1: edited by Laura R. Prieto and Stephen R. Berry
custom_byline2: foreword by Sandra Slater
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custom_author_blurb:Laura R. Prieto is the Alumni Chair in Public Humanities and professor of history and of women's and gender studies at Simmons University. She is the author of At Home in the Studio: The Professionalization of Women Artists in the United States.

Stephen R. Berry is an associate professor of history at Simmons University and the author of A Path in the Mighty Waters: Shipboard Life and Atlantic Crossings.
custom_reviews:"From Dutch colonists in New Amsterdam and Cyptro-Jews in Mexico to the migration of free women of color from Haiti and the establishment of Afro-Brazilian fraternal organizations after abolition, Crossings and Encounters offers an excellent transnational look at interactions of race, gender, and sexuality, as people and ideas crisscrossed the Atlantic in the early modern and modern world."—James N. Green, Brown University

"A marvelous collection of essays that illuminates how the Atlantic World, with its transnational exchanges and encounters, has shaped modern ideas about race, gender, and sexuality."—Catherine Brekus, Harvard University

"This impressive set of essays demonstrates the ways ordinary people have asserted themselves while moving across, around and through Atlantic spaces for five centuries. Readers will appreciate how individual experiences illuminate broader patterns in the shaping of new gendered, sexual and racial identities."—Jon Sensbach, University of Florida
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content: For centuries the Atlantic world has been a site of encounter and exchange, a rich point of transit where one could remake one's identity or find it transformed. Through this interdisciplinary collection of essays, Laura R. Prieto and Stephen R. Berry offer vivid new accounts of how individuals remapped race, gender, and sexuality through their lived experience and in the cultural imagination. Crossings and Encounters is the first single volume to address these three intersecting categories across the Atlantic world and beyond the colonial period.

The Atlantic world offered novel possibilities to and exposed vulnerabilities of many kinds of people, from travelers to urban dwellers, native Americans to refugees. European colonial officials tried to regulate relationships and impose rigid ideologies of gender, while perceived distinctions of culture, religion, and ethnicity gradually calcified into modern concepts of race. Amid the instabilities of colonial settlement and slave societies, people formed cross-racial sexual relationships, marriages, families, and households. These not only afforded some women and men with opportunities to achieve stability; they also furnished ways to redefine one's status.

Crossings and Encounters spans broadly from early contact zones in the seventeenth-century Americas to the postcolonial present, and it covers the full range of the Atlantic world, including the Caribbean, North America, and Latin America. The essays examine the historical intersections between race and gender to illuminate the fluid identities and the dynamic communities of the Atlantic world.
categories: South Carolina, Art & Photography, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:South Carolina Artist, Journalist, Cartoonist
custom_byline1: Joan A. Inabinet
custom_byline2: L. Glen Inabinet
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custom_author_blurb:Joan A. Inabinet and L. Glen Inabinet, freelance writers and editors specializing in local history, are former teachers, English and history, respectively, and co-authors of A History of Kershaw County, South Carolina, with seven books between them.
custom_reviews:""Reflected in a lifetime of cartooning, Jak Smyrl was a kind and gentle soul who championed the downtrodden and gave voice to the hapless dogs, birds, and myriad critters populating his creations. Perhaps the legend found in his iconic maps best explains our reaction to his comic genius: 'One inch equals one smile.'""—Robert Ariail, award-winning editorial cartoonist

""A rich and colorful portrait of the world of Jak Smyrl, beloved artist/cartoonist for the State and the Columbia Record. The Inabinets take us on an engrossing ride through Smyrl's Camden childhood during the Depression, his war years in the Pacific, and his life as a cultural cartoonist afterwards. A vivid tapestry of remembrance of South Carolina during the twentieth century.""—Tony Scully, mayor, Camden, South Carolina (2012–2016)
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content: "I was just a poor artist. I couldn't afford a 'C.'"

This quip by Jak Smyrl, born Oscar Jackson Smyrl, Jr., in Camden, South Carolina, captures all the charm, humility, and humor of a one-of-a-kind character, beloved cartoonist, artist, and journalist who uniquely rendered his era and place with his pen, brushes, and words. In this long-overdue biography ranging from his humble beginnings to being honored by the South Carolina General Assembly "for his distinguished career as an artist" with thanks for "lightening the heart of uncounted South Carolinians," his life and legacy is honored, and his love for South Carolina is magnified.

Warm and intimate, this is the story of a gentle and self-effacing man with an uncanny talent and a dry, whip-smart sense of humor that was never cruel but brought people together while enlarging their lives with pleasure. He discovered his talent while young and used it throughout his life to spotlight not only the foibles of the world around him but the goodness he found there as well. It was a good life, well lived yet not without its sorrows—but always infused with an admirable and infectious optimism, a hallmark of his character.

From Smyrl's work illustrating members of his high school football team for a newspaper to his war experiences, and from his struggling-artist days as a student at the University of South Carolina and the Art Institute of Pittsburgh to landing his dream job, where he became "Jak" (without that "C"), as the first staff artist of the State newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina, Joan A. Inabinet and L. Glen Inabinet highlight excerpts from his letters and diaries that offer trenchant insights into the man and his times.

Enhanced by photographs and Smyrl's illustrations, The World of Jak Smyrl presents a remarkable slice of small-town and rural southern life in the 1920s and 30s, moving on to the wider world and the turmoil of World War II through the turn of the millennium. Some artists' lives are worth chronicling because their unique vision and their works are fine-tuned to capturing the flavor of an era and its color—Jak Smyrl's life is one of these.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, paperback, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Gerald Alva Miller, Jr.
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custom_author_blurb:Gerald Alva Miller, Jr., earned his doctorate in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Exploring the Limits of the Human through Science Fiction and Understanding William Gibson. He teaches at Alamance Community College in Graham, North Carolina.
custom_reviews:""Understanding William S. Burroughs provides an ideal point of entry for readers intimidated at the prospect of delving into the life and work of this challenging, sometimes outrageous author. Dexterously moving through Burroughs's novels as well as an impressive array of secondary sources, Gerald Miller makes a compelling case for Burroughs's centrality to postmodern literature and poststructuralist philosophy.""—Nathaniel Cadle, Florida International University

""In Understanding William Burroughs, Gerald Miller conjures a welcome, timely vision of the writer's art. Combining literary history, philosophy and biography, Miller offers uncompromising accounts of an important American artist, drawing him out from the shadow of literary myth to illuminate the kaleidoscopic individual works and career.""—Henry Veggian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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content: Through critical readings Gerald Alva Miller, Jr., examines the life of William S. Burroughs and the evolution of his various radical styles not just in writing but also in audio, film, and painting. Although Burroughs remains tied to the Beat Generation, his works prove more revolutionary. Miller argues that Burroughs, more than any other author, ushered in the era of both postmodern fiction and poststructural philosophy. Through this study Miller situates Burroughs within the larger countercultural movements that began in the 1950s, when his novels became influential because of their examination of various control systems (from sex and drugs to global or even intergalactic conspiracies).

Understanding William S. Burroughs begins by considering his early, straightforward narratives. Despite being more stylistically conventional, they broke new ground with their depictions of junkies, gay people, and others marginalized by society. The publication of Naked Lunch shattered all literary paradigms in terms of form and content. Naked Lunch and the cut-up novels, recordings, films, and art that followed constitute one of the twentieth century's most sustained and methodical aesthetic experiments, placing Burroughs alongside Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Vladimir Nabokov, and Thomas Pynchon in terms of both innovation and influence.

Burroughs eventually turned his attention toward imagining methods of using the control "machinery" against itself. Often considered his masterpiece, the Red Night Trilogy of the 1980s ranges across time and space, and life and death, in its quest to discover the ultimate form of freedom. His antiestablishment stance and virulent attacks on various types of oppression have caused Burroughs to remain a highly influential figure to each new generation of authors, artists, musicians, and philosophers. The hippies, punks, and cyberpunks were all heavily indebted to the man whom many people called el hombre invisible, and his works prove more relevant than ever in the twenty-first century.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Jolie A. Sheffer
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custom_author_blurb:Jolie A. Sheffer is an associate professor of English and American culture studies and director of the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society at Bowling Green State University. She is the author of The Romance of Race: Incest, Miscegenation, and Multiculturalism in the United States, 1880–1930. Sheffer's work has appeared in several anthologies and in journals including MELUS, the Journal of Asian American Studies, College Literature, and Pedagogy.
custom_reviews:"An excellent, richly illuminating introduction to a writer of capacious imagination, dazzling aesthetic experimentation, and profound commitments—humane, political, and ecological. Jolie Sheffer's short book will help readers find their footing on Yamashita's globe, through admirably clear prose alive in every moment to the complexity of her multifaceted, tragicomic vision."—Caroline Rody, University of Virginia

"Understanding Karen Tei Yamashita takes seriously and centrally the diverse oeuvre of an author whose work reflects and refracts a multilayered geopolitical imaginary marked by transnational complexities, dizzying cultural dynamics, and multivalent historical reckonings. Sheffer's ability to navigate such variegated artistic terrains is both aspirational and impressive."—Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, University of Connecticut
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content: Among the most trenchant and provocative writers of globalization, Karen Tei Yamashita is one of the most significant, ambitious, and widely taught Asian American writers today. In four genre-bending novels, a short story collection/travel essay collage, a family memoir, and more than a dozen performance/theater works, Yamashita weaves together postmodernism, magical realism, history, social protest, and a wicked sense of humor.

Her fictions challenge familiar literary tropes, especially those expected of "multicultural writers," such as the now-clichéd conflict between first-generation immigrants and their American-born children. Instead her canvas is global, conjuring the unexpected intimacies and distances created by international capitalism, as people and goods traverse continents in asymmetrical circuits. Highlighting the connections between neoliberal economic policies, environmental devastation and climate change, anti-immigrant rhetoric, urban gentrification, and other issues that disproportionately affect historically underinvested and minority communities, Yamashita brings a uniquely transnational perspective to her portrayal of distinctly American preoccupations.

Sheffer gives readers a concise introduction to Yamashita's life, provides lucid analysis of key motifs, and synthesizes major research on her work. Each chapter offers, in accessible prose, original interpretations of essential works and stages in her career: her Brazil-Japan migration trilogy comprising Brazil-Maru, Through the Arc of the Rain Forest, and Circle K Cycles; the magical realist revision of the Los Angeles riots in Tropic of Orange; her historical magnum opus about Asian American activism in the long 1960s, I Hotel; her understudied theatrical and performance works collected in Anime Wong; and her recent familial memoir about Japanese American internment during World War II, Letters to Memory. In short the volume serves as both a lucid introduction to a challenging author and a valuable resource for students and scholars.
categories: Literary Studies, Understanding Contemporary American Literature, ebook, hardcover, Books, Linda Wagner-Martin,
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custom_byline1: Margaret Hallissy
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custom_author_blurb:Margaret Hallissy is a professor of English at Long Island University Post in Brookville, New York. She is the author of Understanding Contemporary Irish Fiction and Drama; Reading Irish-American Fiction: The Hyphenated Self; A Companion to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales; Clean Maids, True Wives, Steadfast Widows: Chaucer's Women and Medieval Codes of Conduct; and Venomous Woman: Fear of the Female in Literature.
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content: Alice McDermott—winner of the National Book Award, American Book Award, and Whiting Award, and three-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize—recently published her eighth novel, The Ninth Hour, to great critical and popular acclaim. Her previous books, including Charming Billy, At Weddings and Wakes, and That Night, have been lauded as crowning achievements of Irish American fiction. An Irish American Catholic born and raised in New York, McDermott uses multiple identities and a distinctive, nonchronological narrative style to create an unmistakable trademark. She currently serves as the Richard A. Macksey Professor of the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University.

Understanding Alice McDermott begins with a brief biography and transitions into a linear inquiry of McDermott's published works. In addition to interrogating her recurring motifs of memory and heritage, Margaret Hallissy tracks various themes that appear throughout the novels—religion, generational trauma, geography, family, motherhood, and displacement—topics that intertwine and inform the mentality of McDermott's characters. This volume deftly leads the reader through each of McDermott's novels, seeking connections and facilitating conversations among her earliest and most recent works.

Hallissy demonstrates a deep critical understanding of intersections in McDermott's canon. Her characters in some ways are beleaguered by society's perception of them—uneducated, lower-middle-class immigrants or children of immigrants—but are also positively defined by their collective dream of a lost homeland and the shared hardship of motherhood. By tracing the shifting themes and motifs through eight novels, uncollected short stories, and essays published during McDermott's fruitful career, Understanding Alice McDermott provides a window into the decades-long development of a contemporary master.
categories: Literary Studies, hardcover, Books,
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custom_byline1: Frédérique Spill
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custom_author_blurb:Frédérique Spill is associate professor of American literature at the University of Picardy–Jules Verne in Amiens, France, where she also supervises a research group. She is the author of L'Idiotie dans l'œuvre de William Faulkner. Spill coedited The Wagon Moves: New Essays on As I Lay Dying and contributed to Critical Insights: The Sound and the Fury, Faulkner at Fifty: Tutors and Tyros, Conversations with Ron Rash, and Summoning the Dead.
custom_reviews:"The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing makes a major and original contribution to scholarly analysis of Rash's work. Spill's monograph brims with new insights into Rash's fiction and poetry while also skillfully incorporating previous critical commentary about his books. Her consistently perceptive, detailed assessment of Rash's literary achievement will certainly enhance his already substantial reputation."—John Lang, Emory & Henry College

"Frederique Spill has exciting insights into the work of Ron Rash. We who have admired Rash's poetry and fiction for many years are especially delighted to see the appreciation his work has won abroad. The French were among the first to recognize a number of American authors. It is thrilling to learn they have added Ron Rash to their pantheon."—Robert Morgan, New York Times bestselling author of Gap Creek

"Though I have long revered the fiction and poetry of Ron Rash, I'm not sure I fully appreciated the depth, beauty, and insight of his work until I read Frédérique Spill's remarkable The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing. Here is a work possessing its own radiance, free of obfuscating theory, and full of the sort of precise observations that animate Rash's work. This book will be as useful to scholars as it is accessible to serious readers."—Mark Powell, author of Firebird and Small Treasons

"In the ever-mounting body of scholarship on Ron Rash, Frederique Spill's remarkable The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing towers. Indeed, Spill's book – in prose nuanced and pitched to perfection – radiates the yield of her indefatigable forensic study of Rash's abiding Appalachian aesthetic and his prolific output and uncanny range as a poet, short fiction writer, and novelist. This utterly indispensable volume underscores Ron Rash's place as the contemporary master of Appalachian literature."—Joseph Bathanti, North Carolina Poet Laureate (2102-14) and author of The Life of the World to Come
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content: The Radiance of Small Things in Ron Rash's Writing examines how the poet's language bristles with a variety of carefully registered sensory perceptions detailing minute objects, some of which, Frédérique Spill argues, less poetic minds than his might consider insignificant. Through its eleven chapters, each devoted to a different book in order of publication, Spill's study shows how prone Rash is to making violence cohabit with beauty, thus imbuing the dreariest situations with a poignant brightness, an unlikely luminescence.

The overall discussion highlights the evolution of Rash's writing toward a dense inventiveness and a keen poetic awareness of the workings of the natural world, which reaches a peak with the publication of Above the Waterfall. However, readers more particularly interested in one specific book may consult chapters separately. The volume concludes with three interviews with Rash, respectively focusing on novels, short stories, and poetry.

Through close readings and systematic observations of Ron Rash's writing, Spill hopes to illuminate these seemingly insignificant details. They somehow contain larger elements—textual components that could remain unnoticed but might very well prove fraught with significance.
categories: Religious Studies, ebook, hardcover, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Contemporary Witches, Wiccans, and Others Who Practice Alone
custom_byline1: Helen A. Berger
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custom_author_blurb:Helen A. Berger is a resident scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis University and emerita professor of sociology at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States and coauthor of Voices from the Pagan Census: A National Survey of Witches and Neo-Pagans in the United States and Teenage Witches: Magical Youth and the Search for the Self.
custom_reviews:"Helen Berger has produced a first-rate study of the most important form of modern Paganism, making her the leading authority upon it."—Ronald Hutton, University of Bristol

"Once more, Berger's formidable work provides important insight for those who study the contemporary Pagan religious movement. Scholarship to date has all but ignored the elephant in the room—the fact that most Pagans are solitary. Berger gives us the best available description of what is an often-hidden, regularly-misunderstood, population. The newly-published "Solitary Pagans" is an outstanding resource, not only for Pagan scholars, but also for Pagan and interfaith seminarians, chaplains and spiritual care workers."—Holli Emore, M.Div., Executive Director of the Cherry Hill Seminary

"This authoritative survey of contemporary paganism combines sympathetic portrayal with rich new data. It highlights neglected themes like the importance of solitaries and eclectics. It will be the new reference point for anyone interested in this rapidly-growing religious milieu."—Linda Woodhead, Research Fellow, Stanford University; Lancaster University

"Solitary Pagans is a welcome, and needed, follow-up to Helen A. Berger's The Voices of the Pagan Census (2003). It reports on Berger's impeccable and detailed "The Pagan Census Revisited" and her cogent analysis in accessible and beautifully written prose. This book should be owned and read by scholars of religions in America, new religions studies, and contemporary Pagan studies. It needs to be in every university and college library."—Catherine Wessinger, Rev. H. James Yamauchi, S.J. Professor of the History of Religions, Loyola University

"No one has done more than Helen Berger to provide statistical evidence for the most significant trends in twenty-first century Paganism and sensitive portraits of individual Pagans' lives. Solitary Pagans offers a compelling argument that from voting to recycling, these solitary religious practitioners, instead of being civically disengaged, are more politically active than the average American."—Sarah M. Pike, author of Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary Pagans and the Search for Community

"Specialists in the study of modern Paganism should read Solitary Pagans, which will also appeal to sociologists interested in American religion and the transformations it is presently undergoing."—Nova Religio

"Solitary Pagans represents the most up-to date, comprehensive picture of the Pagan community and is an important read."—Sociology of Religion
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content: Solitary Pagans is the first book to explore the growing phenomenon of contemporary Pagans who practice alone. Although the majority of Pagans in the United States have abandoned the tradition of practicing in groups, little is known about these individuals or their way of practice. Helen A. Berger fills that gap by building on a massive survey of contemporary practitioners. By examining the data, Berger describes solitary practitioners demographically and explores their spiritual practices, level of social engagement, and political activities. Contrasting the solitary Pagans with those who practice in groups and more generally with other non-Pagan Americans, she also compares contemporary U.S. Pagans with those in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada.

Berger brings to light the new face of contemporary paganism by analyzing those who learn about the religion from books or the Internet and conduct rituals alone in their gardens, the woods, or their homes. Some observers believe this social isolation and political withdrawal has resulted in an increase in narcissism and a decline in morality, while others argue to the contrary that it has produced a new form of social integration and political activity. Berger posits the implications of her findings to reveal a better understanding of other metaphysical religions and those who shun traditional religious organizations.
categories: Rhetoric & Communication, Studies in Rhetoric & Communication, ebook, hardcover, Books, Thomas W. Benson,
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custom_byline1: M. Lane Bruner
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custom_author_blurb:M. Lane Bruner is professor and chair of the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is the author of several books, including Strategies of Remembrance and Repressive Regimes, Aesthetic States, and Arts of Resistance, and his essays have appeared in such journals as the Quarterly Journal of Speech, Rhetoric and Public Affairs, and Philosophy and Rhetoric.
custom_reviews:"This text is a well-documented analysis of the contours of our collective rhetorical unconscious. Bruner has interwoven theoretical concepts in crafting a provocative account of our rhetorical unconscious and the role of psychoanalysis in investigating and critiquing its collective presence as the backdrop against which we experience life."—Raymie E. McKerrow, Ohio University

"Building upon a vast range of scholarship in rhetorical theory and critical theory, this book offers the most developed framework to date for analyzing rhetoric at the unconscious level of material structures and power formations. The book should be praised not only for its cutting-edge theoretical and methodological innovations but also for its insightful, historically-informed case studies."—Joshua Hanan, University of Denver

"This work is a fresh and illuminating contribution to the vital critical project of reimagining rhetoric beyond the confines of intentional and strategic models of influence without giving up the very idea of persuasion as a practical art. Bruner offers a promising way of converting well-known impediments to intentional theories of persuasion into productive resources for a new and expansive rhetorical remit."—Michael Kaplan, Baruch College, CUNY
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content: Rhetorical Unconsciousness and Political Psychoanalysis investigates unintentional forms of persuasion, their political consequences, and our ethical relation to the same. M. Lane Bruner argues that the unintentional ways we are persuaded are far more important than intentional persuasion; in fact all intentional persuasion is built on the foundations of rhetorical unconsciousness, whether we are persuaded through ignorance (the unsayable), unconscious symbolic processes (the unspoken), or productive repression (the unspeakable).

Bruner brings together a wide range of theoretical approaches to unintentional persuasion, establishing the locations of such persuasion and providing examples taken from the Western European transition from feudalism to capitalism. To be more specific, phenomena related to artificial personhood and the commodity self have led to transformations in material culture from architecture to theater, showing how rhetorical unconsciousness works to create symptoms. Bruner then examines ethical considerations, the relationships among language in use, unconsciousness, and the seemingly irrational aspects of cultural and political history.
categories: World History, Historians in Conversation, paperback, Books,
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custom_subtitle:Historians in Conversation
custom_byline1: edited by Donald A. Yerxa
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custom_author_blurb:Donald A. Yerxa is assistant director of the Historical Society and editor of Historically Speaking. A professor of history at Eastern Nazarene College in Quincy, Massachusetts, Yerxa is the author of The Burning of Falmouth, 1775 and Admirals and Empire: The United States Navy and the Caribbean, 1898–1945 and coauthor of Species of Origins: America's Search for a Creation Story.
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content: Described as "the New York Review of Books for history," Historically Speaking has emerged as one of the most distinctive historical publications in recent years, actively seeking out contributions from a pantheon of leading voices in historical discourse from both inside and outside academia. Recent Themes in World History and the History of the West represents some of the best writing on Western civilization and world history in the past five years. This collection of essays and interviews from Historically Speaking gives leading historians' approaches to the continually evolving field of world history, with a specific emphasis on the relationship of Western civilization to the history of the world. The book also discusses the effect of empire on global history and the many ways empire continues to manifest in the contemporary world. The contributors discuss world history as an intricate story of the connections within the global community, rather than a tidy, static narrative that attempts to summarize everything in our global past. In this volume the study of world history is presented as a constantly comparative endeavor, concerned with the major themes that link and divide humanity.
categories: Children's Literature, Young Palmetto Books, ebook, hardcover, Books, Kim Jeffcoat/SCCCBL,
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custom_subtitle:A Nun's Truce with General Sherman
custom_byline1: Martha Dunsky
custom_byline2: illustrated by Monica Wyrick
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custom_author_blurb:Martha Dunsky, a member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, is a former award-winning television reporter/videographer and producer and a retired technical editor for the National Air and Space Intelligence Center.

Monica Wyrick has a fine arts degree from the University of Dayton and has worked in advertising, as a muralist, and as an art instructor. She is the illustrator of Crabbing, Dreaming with Animals, The H. L. Hunley Submarine, and Art Smart, Science Detective, all published by the University of South Carolina Press.
custom_reviews:"Fire and Forgiveness is a thoughtful, beautifully illustrated work that emphasizes stories of kindness and mercy during a time of war. The intimate tale reminds us how human goodness can triumph over violence and fear"—Martha Moody, author of Washington Post bestseller Best Friends

"As the Civil War moves closer to Columbia, two girls in a convent school carry on their own battle. It's exciting to see another "forgotten" Civil War story brought vividly to life for today's readers."—Kathy Cannon Wiechman, winner of the 2015 Grateful American Book Prize for Like a River: A Civil War Novel

"As Mother Baptista said, 'If you want to have any peace in this world, it must begin with the children.' Amid the horrors of war, terrified children, and a burning city, Dunsky deftly emphasizes this truth. In addition to all that, it's a page turner!"—Fran Hawk, author of The H. L. Hunley Submarine

"Fire and Forgiveness is a thoughtful, beautifully illustrated work that emphasizes stories of kindness and mercy during a time of war. The intimate tale reminds us how human goodness can triumph over violence and fear."—Martha Moody, author of Washington Post bestseller Best Friends
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content: Making peace with her spiteful classmate, Clara, seems impossible to Jane. Despite encouragement from Mother Baptista, the mother superior at their convent school, Jane and Clara dig in their heels. As the girls brood they hear the cannons of the Civil War explode outside their school as General Sherman and the Union army attack the city of Columbia, South Carolina, in February 1865.

Mother Baptista asks Sherman for protection for her nuns and students, and he promises they will be safe inside their convent school. But despite his promise they have to flee in the middle of the night through a chaotic, burning city. Will Mother Baptista forgive Sherman for breaking his promise? Can Jane and Clara make peace when the adults in their world are at odds and at war?

Set during the most deadly and divisive war in U.S. history, this compelling story is based on first-person accounts of true events. Fire and Forgiveness is a reminder of the important role forgiveness and peacemaking play in life's conflicts big and small, whether between quarreling children, proud adults, or warring nations.
categories: Rhetoric & Communication, Studies in Rhetoric & Communication, Psychology, Medicine & Science, ebook, hardcover, Books, Thomas W. Benson,
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Pages: 192
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custom_subtitle:The Discursive Construction of the Psychiatric Patient, 1850-1920
custom_byline1: Christina Hanganu-Bresch and Carol Berkenkotter
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custom_author_blurb:Cristina Hanganu-Bresch is an associate professor of writing and rhetoric at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. Her work on issues related to the rhetoric of health and psychiatry has appeared in Written Communication, Literature and Medicine, and edited collections. She is the coeditor with Justin Everett of Minefield of Dreams: Triumphs and Travails of Independent Writing Programs. Carol Berkenkotter was a professor in the Writing Studies Department at the University of Minnesota until her death in 2016. She is the author of Patient Tales: Case Histories and the Uses of Narrative in Psychiatry and coauthor (with Thomas Huckin) of the award-winning Genre Knowledge in Disciplinary Communication: Cognition/Culture/Power.
custom_reviews:"Diagnosing Madness is a superb and highly readable rhetorical, linguistic, sociolinguistic, and literary analysis of the psychiatric argumentation practices and the life stories of individual mental patients before and after they were diagnosed—some wrongfully—in late 19th century Britain and America. Employing unique and rich archival research of asylum records and court proceedings as well as serialized novels, the authors reveal the medicolegal relationship between diagnosis and the concepts of normality, personhood, identity, and autonomy."—Mary Schuster, University of Minnesota, reviewing a previous edition or volume
custom_awards:Choice 2020 Outstanding Academic Title
content: Diagnosing Madness is a study of the linguistic negotiations at the heart of mental illness identification and patient diagnosis. Through an examination of individual psychiatric case records from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Cristina Hanganu-Bresch and Carol Berkenkotter show how the work of psychiatry was navigated by patients, families, doctors, the general public, and the legal system. The results of examining those involved and their interactions show that the psychiatrist's task became one of constant persuasion, producing arguments surrounding diagnosis and asylum confinement that attempted to reconcile shifting definitions of disease and to respond to sociocultural pressures.

By studying patient cases, the emerging literature of confinement, and patient accounts viewed alongside institutional records, the authors trace the evolving rhetoric of psychiatric disease, its impact on the treatment of patients, its implications for our contemporary understanding of mental illness, and the identity of the psychiatric patient. Diagnosing Madness helps elucidate the larger rhetorical forces that contributed to the eventual decline of the asylum and highlights the struggle for the professionalization of psychiatry.

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